August 1, 2013

How to rebuild a leaf blower carburetor

By Lyle Weischwill
How to rebuild a leaf blower carburetor

This DIY repair guide shows how to rebuild a leaf blower carburetor. The carburetor mixes fuel and air in the right proportions so that the spark plug can ignite the mixture inside the cylinder, powering the engine. If the leaf blower engine won't start even though there's fuel in the tank, the carburetor could be the problem. Follow these instructions to rebuild a carburetor using a manufacturer-approved replacement part.

Follow these steps to rebuild the carburetor on Craftsman, Poulan, MTD, Husqvarna, Weed Eater and Troybilt leaf blowers.

Another option is to replace the carburetor, following the steps in How to Replace a Leaf Blower Carburetor.

Quick links
Tools required
Torx screwdriver
Needle-nose pliers
Work gloves
Repair difficulty
Time required
60 minutes or less
Repair difficulty
Time required
60 minutes or less

Instructions

01.

Drain the fuel tank

In a well-ventilated area, remove the fuel cap and empty the fuel tank into an approved storage container.

Drain the fuel tank.

Drain the fuel tank.

02.

Disconnect the spark plug wire

Disconnect the spark plug wire.

Disconnect the wire from the spark plug.

Disconnect the wire from the spark plug.

03.

Remove the air filter cover

Remove the screws from the air filter cover.

Remove the air filter cover.

Remove the air filter cover screws.

Remove the air filter cover screws.

Remove the air filter cover.

Remove the air filter cover.

04.

Remove the carburetor

Remove the carburetor mounting screws.

Pull the air box out and release it from the carburetor throttle and choke levers.

Note the configuration of the small and large fuel lines on the carburetor. Remove the fuel lines from the carburetor.

Discard the carburetor.

Remove the carburetor mounting screws.

Remove the carburetor mounting screws.

Pull off the air box.

Pull off the air box.

Remove the fuel lines from the carburetor.

Remove the fuel lines from the carburetor.

Remove the carburetor.

Remove the carburetor.

05.

Remove the top cover and primer bulb

Remove the top cover with the primer bulb from the carburetor. 

Remove the primer bulb from the top cover.

Remove the gasket and diaphragm from the top cover.

Replace the primer bulb if it’s stiff or damaged.

Tip: Line up the components on your work surface so that you can replace the parts in order.
Remove the carburetor top cover screws.

Remove the carburetor top cover screws.

Remove the carburetor top cover.

Remove the carburetor top cover.

Remove the primer bulb.

Remove the primer bulb.

Remove the gasket and diaghragm.

Remove the gasket and diaghragm.

06.

Remove the bottom cover and diaphragm

Use a Phillips screwdriver to remove the screws from the bottom cover of the carburetor.

Remove the bottom cover and diaphragm.

Separate the bottom cover and the diaphragm.

Remove the screws from the bottom cover.

Remove the screws from the bottom cover.

Pull off the bottom cover and diaphragm.

Pull off the bottom cover and diaphragm.

Separate the bottom cover and diaphragm.

Separate the bottom cover and diaphragm.

07.

Remove the screw securing the needle and fuel lever

On the bottom of the carburetor, note how the lever, spring and hinge pin fit together. Remove the screw and pull those components out of the carburetor.

Remove the screw.

Remove the screw.

Remove the components.

Remove the components.

08.

Clean the carburetor and let dry

Clean all ports and jets in the body of the carburetor with aerosol carburetor cleaner and compressed air. Allow the carburetor dry for at least 10 minutes—some carburetor cleaners can damage the diaphragms if the carburetor is reassembled when still wet.

09.

Reassemble the carburetor

Install the needle and lever on the bottom of the carburetor and screw them into place. Then install the gasket, diaphragm and cover, in that order.

Install the top cover and primer bulb.

Warning: Install the components in the same order and manner in which they were removed.
Install the needle and lever.

Install the needle and lever.

10.

Reinstall the carburetor

Push the fuel lines onto the proper connections on the carburetor.

Insert the carburetor into the air box with the throttle and choke levers positioned properly.

Position the carburetor on the side of the engine and reinstall the mounting screws.

Reconnect the fuel lines.

Reconnect the fuel lines.

Reinstall the carburetor mounting screws.

Reinstall the carburetor mounting screws.

11.

Reinstall the air filter cover

Position the air filter cover over the carburetor and secure it with the mounting screws.

Reinstall the air filter cover.

Reinstall the air filter cover.

12.

Connect the spark plug

Reattach the spark plug wire.

Reattach the spark plug wire.

Reattach the spark plug wire.

Warning: Undertaking repairs to appliances can be hazardous. Use the proper tools and safety equipment noted in the guide and follow all instructions. Do not proceed until you are confident that you understand all of the steps and are capable of completing the repair. Some repairs should only be performed by a qualified technician.
Symptoms for gas leaf blowers

Choose a symptom to see related leaf blower repairs.

Main causes: stale fuel, dirty air filter, bad spark plug, cracked fuel lines, clogged carburetor
Main causes: cracked fuel lines, leaky carburetor seals, damaged fuel tank cap, cracked fuel tank
Main causes: damaged fan blade, engine needs a tune up, dirty carburetor
Main causes: bad gas, clogged air filter, cracked fuel lines, clogged fuel filter, dirty carburetor, bad spark plug, worn piston rings
Main causes: mixing too much 2-cycle oil with the gas, dirty air filter, clogged carburetor, engine needs tune up
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August 1, 2013
By Lyle Weischwill
How to replace a leaf blower carburetor

The carburetor could be the problem If the leaf blower engine won't start even though there's fuel in the tank. Follow these instructions to replace the carburetor.

Repair difficulty
Time required
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Repair difficulty
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August 1, 2013
By Lyle Weischwill
How to rebuild a leaf blower carburetor

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Repair difficulty
Time required
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