May 10, 2015

How to maintain a treadmill

By Sears PartsDirect staff
How to maintain a treadmill.

You've made a commitment to treat yourself well and keep yourself in shape, and one of the ways you do this is with your treadmill. But if you're not treating the treadmill well, it may not be able to keep up with the pace you've set for yourself. Just like a regular exercise routine works for keeping you at your best, a regular maintenance routine for your treadmill is the best way to keep it working at its peak performance level.

Before each use check for loose, damaged or worn parts. Don’t use the treadmill if any damage or worn parts exist–replace the part instead. Doing so not only will extend the life of your treadmill; it can protect you from getting hurt.

After each use, wipe down the treadmill with a clean, damp cloth to remove sweat and dirt. Avoid excessive moisture around and on the console. Cleaning the treadmill after each use will help keep dirt and bacteria from building up on the machine.

Once a week check the rollers for smooth operation. Sweep or vacuum under and around the treadmill to prevent dirt and dust from entering the machine at the base, the belt and around the platform. Thoroughly clean the machine with a damp cloth to remove any accumulated dirt or dust.

Once a month, check the screws and bolts and tighten if needed. Look at the belt’s alignment and tension. If you see any problems, follow the instructions in your owner's manual for aligning and tensioning the belt.

Once every three months or after every 25 hours of use, lubricate the walking belt with a silicone-based lubricant. Even if you don't use the treadmill frequently, it's important to keep the belt from drying out. Check your owner's manual for detailed instructions.

For more ways to keep your treadmill performing at its best, check out our treadmill DIY repair help section.

Symptoms for treadmills

Choose a symptom to see related treadmill repairs.

Main causes: damaged walking belt, improper belt tension, lack of belt lubricant, bad drive motor
Main causes: no power, bad power cord, tripped or faulty overload switch, bad power switch, wiring failure, bad motor control board
Main causes: bad control console, wiring failure, bad motor control board
Main causes: rear roller out of alignment, damaged walking belt, bad roller
Main causes: damaged walking belt, improper belt tension, bad roller bearing
Main causes: faulty sensors, wiring failure, bad control console
Main causes: missing safety key, bad control console, wiring failure, faulty motor control board, bad drive motor
Repair guides for treadmills

These step-by-step repair guides will help you safely fix what’s broken on your treadmill.

How to replace a treadmill walking belt

A worn walking belt will begin to slow down during use. If your treadmill walking belt is worn out, replace it using these steps.

Repair difficulty
Time required
 45 minutes or less
June 1, 2015
By Lyle Weischwill
How to replace a treadmill walking board

A worn-out walking board creates friction with the walking belt and causes the belt to slow down during use. Replace the walking board if it's worn or damaged.

Repair difficulty
Time required
 30 minutes or less
June 1, 2015
By Lyle Weischwill
How to replace a treadmill drive motor

A defective drive motor won't run when activated by the motor controller. Replace the treadmill drive motor if it doesn't run.

Repair difficulty
Time required
 15 minutes or less
Articles and videos for treadmills

Use the advice and tips in these articles and videos to get the most out of your treadmill.

December 21, 2016
How to troubleshoot treadmill problems
By Sears PartsDirect staff

See what to check if you're having a problem with your treadmill, and what you can do to fix it.

June 29, 2015
Easy DIY treadmill repairs
By Sears PartsDirect staff

Learn about treadmill repairs that you can easily do yourself.

May 10, 2015
How to maintain a treadmill
By Sears PartsDirect staff

Keep your treadmill in shape by following these tips.