Model #WET-480A MODERN MAID Counter Unit Electric

  • (let-480) (aet-480a) (cet-480a) (het-480a) (ket-480a) (let-480a) (wet-480a) (aet-480b) (cet-480b) (het-480b) (let-480b) (ket-480b) (wet-480b) (aet-480c) (cet-480c) (het-480c) (let-480c) (ket-480c) (wet-480c)
    3 Results
  • (aet-480) (cet-480) (het-480) (ket-480) (wet-480)
    3 Results
Find part by diagram >

Question and Answers

Q:

wet dishes

A:

Pvalde2 provided some links for previous answers in the above response. Those previous answers may help you determine the cause of your problem. As noted in the second link, the plastic dishes will normally not dry even if the heater is working since they don't retain heat.

If the glass and ceramic dishes are not drying even though the heating element is apparently working, you could have a problem with the rinse aid dispenser. Make sure that the rinse aid dispenser is full. Check your setting and make sure that it is appropriate for your level of water hardness. If you suspect that the rinse aid dispenser is not working, you can check it using the diagnostic test shown in the first image below. In the 12th interval of that test, the dispenser should be getting voltage from the control board. If the dispenser is not working, you could have a problem with the dispenser assembly, the wiring or the control board. The second image shows the wiring diagram and a strip circuit for the dispenser system. You can shut off the circuit breaker and use that information to check the wiring and the dispenser circuit. I don't recommend that you perform any live voltage checks on the dispenser system. That type of test should be conducted by a service technician. Here is a link for the Sears Service website in case you need it: Sears Home Services .

If you need parts, you can order them from the Sears PartsDirect website.

I hope that this information helps. If you need more assistance, reply with additional details.

Read More
Lyle W -
Sears Technician
December 18, 2010
Q:

Wet Appliances

A:

Fred answered your first question. He is on vacation this week to I will try to answer your questions.

  1. In regards to how the oven is different, the oven has insulation that can easily get wet and ruined. It also has high voltage contacts and wiring that can short directly to the metal cabinet and cause a severe risk of electrical shock. I assume that the insurance adjuster knows this about the range and did not want to take a chance on repairing that appliance verses replacing it. I agree with that approach. Since the appliances that you describe in your details have similar electro-mechanical devices and contacts, I am surprised that the concession has been made to replace the range without resistance and the other appliances were not also replaced if they encountered the same water damage.
  2. I reviewed Fred's previous answer. I agree with the fact that appliances can sometimes work normally after they have gotten wet. There is a distinct likelihood that even if the appliance works, the useful life will be shortened. I normally recommend that the appliance be replaced after severe water damage occurred. The appliance is not intended to be exposed to water drenching or submersion. As a technician called to examine appliances that were subjected to water damage, I could examine them for apparent damage. I cannot directly speak for the technician that will examine your appliances but I suspect that there will be enough water damage to warrant the replacement of the appliances. If this situation happened to me, I would not want to operate appliances that have been drenched with water. I would especially not want my family to operate those appliances due to the inherent electrical shock risks.
  3. Water will often leave stains and corrosion on components. Electrical spade connectors and plugs will often show rust or discoloration. Some appliances have some cardboard components that will definitely show signs of water damage. A technician will be able to see these signs of water damage.
  4. Water will often leave stains. If wiring connectors and contacts are exposed to water, they will often be discolored or show corrosion (rust or pitting). A technician will often be able to see this when inspecting the appliance.
  5. As noted above, I would not feel safe using an appliance once it is drenched with water (even tap water). Tap water has impurities that will corrode wiring connectors. The water does not have to be muddy to cause damage.
  6. I cannot speak directly for Fred, but I stand firmly on my opinion that I would not want to handle or use appliances that have been drenched with water or partially submerged in water. I especially would not want my family member to be exposed to these risks.
  7. It is extremely likely that a field inspection by an expert or technician will reveal significant damage due to water damage. The technician or expert that examines the appliances will probably have the same concerns that I have about the safely and longevity of the appliance following water damage.
  8. Since the appliances that you are describing were apparently drenched with water raining down from a leak above them, they will likely have damage that will cause them to be unsafe either now or at a later date. If only a little bit of water was sprinkled on top of the appliance, there may not be damage in that situation. Water that rains down on the top of the appliance and drips/runs down the sides and back will normally cause damage by getting into internal components that are not designed to be exposed to water.
  9. If an appliance was only superficially exposed to a very limited quantity of water and common sense indicates that there was not significant internal component damage from water exposure, then I would likely accept new parts. I would only accept the new parts if there is no question that other internal components are not damaged or could experience premature failure. If the water exposure was severe, there is little chance of this scenario occurring.

I hope that this information helps. If you need more assistance, reply with additional details and we will try to assist you further.

Read More
Lyle W -
Sears Technician
March 15, 2011
A:

1. Any abnormal quantity to water can cause damage to the appliance. If a single limited spill occurs and is then immediately cleaned up, then this will not normally cause damage. A steady concentrated drip over an extended period of time can cause damage since it can migrate down into the internal components. The outside cabinets of most appliances are not water tight. The shower head affect will be more likely to cause damage. 2. The amount of water that can cause damage can be less than 1 gallon if it migrates down into internal components and wiring connections. The method and time length of exposure are usually factors that affect damage more than the actual quantity of water. 3. I will not state that all damage will be visible. Some appliances have areas and components that are sealed and not intended to be accessed. In areas that can be accessed, you can often view evidence of water exposure. Corrosion may not immediately appear. Dampness in areas that cannot be accessed can cause conditions that will result in corrosion months after the exposure. Undetected damage to water exposure is almost always a distinct possibility. 4. Parts can be damaged by water but not visible to the inspector's eye. As noted above, corrosion may not occur immediately. 5. As noted above, the frame is not intended to be water tight. Appliances that you are describing are intended to be in climate-controlled environments and not exposed to elements such as rain, extreme cold, etc. The outer frame of an appliance provides general protection to small spills and prevents access to internal electro-mechanical components. I hope that this additional information helps. We will be glad to assist you further if needed. Reply with additional details if you need more information or expert opinions.

Read More
Lyle W -
Sears Technician
March 15, 2011
A:

In my opinion, once you have significant water damage it is not possible to repair an appliance by replacing parts to an extent that a person can be 100% certain that the appliance is not compromised.

Read More
Lyle W -
Sears Technician
March 15, 2011
A:

1. Significant water damage is anything more than a simple spill that is cleaned up right away. A major water leak like the one that you described above is likely to cause significant water damage unless an appliance is completely out of the affected area. 2. Significant water damage can often be inferred by damage to surrounding walls, appliances and the ceiling above the appliance. I suspect that you personally witnessed the appliances getting wet as well. These types of factors can indicate that the appliance experienced significant water damage or exposure. 3. My last response may have been misunderstood. I do not think that you can repair a water-damaged appliance with 100% certainty that it will remain safe and reliable for continued normal use. 4. There is a possibility that damage can occur to an appliance that may not be visible during an inspection by a technician. Electrical connections and leads can be dry during an inspection but they may corrode during the next few weeks, months and/or years. 5. We insulation in ranges and refrigerators can grow mold which may cause health problems. Insulating properties of some materials may deteriorate after they get wet. I understand your need to have complete explanations for the scenarios that we have been discussing. We are here to help you with anything that you need. If you need more clarification or advice, let us know.

Read More
Lyle W -
Sears Technician
March 15, 2011
A:

1. The motor may work normally immediately after it is completely dried out. I don't think that the humidity and exposure to moisture that your appliances encountered can be compared to appliances being exposed to higher humidity in Florida. The appliance is not engineered to sit out on the porch in the elements and be rained on or sit in deep puddles of water. I cannot physically examine the environment that your appliances were in. I can only express opinions based on my experience and training from the manufacturers. The field technician expressed his opinion based on physical examination. That opinion is different than mine based on physical observation and many other factors. I will stick with my opinion that I would not be confident that the there is a 100% chance that the motor that you describe will continue to operate through its normal life after having at least 4" of water or more under it that could have made contact with the bottom of the motor. 2. The technician is correct that copper contacts that are submerged or exposed to water will normally show discoloration virtually immediately. That does not mean that the exposure to water will not appear later or that components that were not accessible and instpected could be affected. I provided a document with the source at the bottom that appears to back up the statements that I make about water damaged appliances. 3. I did not find specific information on a Whirlpool model LVV6233AN0 but I assume that it is a top load washer with the lid switch at the top. If the lid switch contacts were bad due to the water exposure, this indicates that you could have other components with with similar contacts that could go bad if they were exposed to water. I agree with you that we cannot dispute the filed tech's observations. His conclusions based on his observations indicate that some of your appliances will be okay based on the amount of water damage evidence that he observed. (continued)

Read More
Lyle W -
Sears Technician
March 18, 2011
A:

His opinion may be correct and it may not. It would not be practical to completely disassemble and examine every single component to examine them scientifically for water damage or corrosion from exposure to abnormal humidity. There is not an exact science dedicated to predicting the failure of appliances due to water damage or exposure. This aspect opens the door to differing opinions. I agree that the washer may work okay now and may work normally for a long time. On the other hand, it may not. That is my opinion and if it differs from the field technician that physically examined the appliances, I hope that this explanation provides the reasons for the differences of opinion. If you have further questions, let me know.

Read More
Lyle W -
Sears Technician
March 18, 2011
See more answers
Q:

dryer got wet

A:

Thank you for your question.

If the dryer were in 6 inches of water, it would have been high enough to get into the motor and the gas valve. I recommend checking the circuit breaker to the dryer to make sure it is not tripped. A dryer has thermostats that can get water inside of them and short out the components. I have always recommended customers to let the dryer dry out for a few days and run dehumidifiers. Then try the dryer if it starts it might last a week or maybe for years there is no way of knowing. The parts may start to rust and failing. If the dryer will not start most likely, it has a failed motor. It is not worth replacing a motor in a flooded dryer. If you have insurance, you need to claim it now because they will not cover it later on. I am sorry for the bad news but I have seen customers spend more in the long run repairing a dryer that was in a flood instead of buying a new one.

If you have any other questions, please reply to this post.

Thank you for using Manage my life.

Mark T.

Read More
Mark T -
Sears Technician
July 26, 2011