Model #AGR5735QDS AMANA free standing, gas

  • Control Panel/top Assembly
    3 Results
  • Cabinet
    3 Results
  • Cavity
    3 Results
  • Gas Controls
    3 Results
  • Door/drawer (stl)
    3 Results
  • Supplemental Information
    3 Results
  • Wiring Information
    3 Results

Question and Answers

Q:

Where can I find a checklist for repairing my Amana oven & broiler?

A:

Here are some tips that may help resolve your problem:

  • If you have no display at all, make sure that the range is properly plugged in and that the outlet is working properly.
  • You did not indicate whether the cook top burners are working. If not, make sure that the range has a proper gas supply.
  • Try unplugging the range for 5 minutes and then plugging it back in. This will reset the electronic control board for the oven. This control board can sometimes get locked up due to a surge or glitch through the electrical lines.
  • Make sure that the control is set properly.
  • You can check the oven temperature sensor probe by following these steps:
    • Unplug the range to disconnect electrical power.
    • Open the oven door and remove the screws that secure the sensor probe to the cavity of the oven.
    • Gently pull the probe out until you can disconnect the wiring connection plug.
    • Unplug the sensor. Using a volt/ohm meter, measure the resistance of the temperature sensor probe. You should measure near 1100 ohms at room temperature. If the resistance is way off, then the temperature probe will need to be replaced.
The above tips may help you resolve the heating problem in your range. Further troubleshooting and diagnosis will normally require a service technician.

If you need more help, resubmit your question with additional details.

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Lyle W -
Sears Technician
Q:

amana oven won't heat up to bake.

A:

I must assume when you stated that you replaced the oven ignitor that you mean you replaced the BAKE ignitor and not the BROIL igniter. If the bake ignitor glows and allows the gas valve to open during the clean cycle then there is nothing to prevent it from glowing and opening the gas valve during the bake cycle.

I added the theory of operation below.

The glow bar system is completely reliant upon electricity. When the oven control is turned on the internal bake relay closes, 120 VAC is provided to the glow bar ignitor and the gas valve circuit. The high resistances of the glow bar limits the current flow through the ignitor/gas valve. Continual current flow through the circuit causes the glow bar ignitor to glow brighter and the resistance of the ignitor decreases, which increases the current flow through the ignitor/gas valve circuit. This increases the amount of heat generated by the heater, which causes the bi-metal to bend. At a point the ignitor resistance will have increased to approximately 3.5 amps of current flow through the ignitor/gas valve circuit. In approximately 45 seconds the glow bar ignitor temperature will have increased to approximately 2650°F. the voltage drop across the gas valve terminals will have increased to about 3 VAC, which will indicate enough current to flow to provide enough bi-metal heat to cause the gas valve to open providing gas flow to the oven burner the heat from the glow bar ignites the gas. The sensing element of the oven control then cycles contacts within the oven control, opening and closing to cycle the glow bar, safety valve, and burner to maintain the desired temperature. NOTE: This system cannot operate without electricity.

The primary components of this ignition system are the electronic control, ignitor, and safety valve. These components are all wired in series and although the oven control and glow bar require 120 VAC, 60 Hz. The oven valve operates on approximately 3 volts. Therefore, 120 VAC should never be applied directly to the oven valve terminals. The glow bar is the power source for the oven valve.

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Joey S -
Sears Technician
September 17, 2010
A:

If the bake ignitor is pulling 3.5 amps this amount of amperage should be sufficient to open the oven safety valve. You would not need a control board because it's providing the voltage to the bake ignitor. The failure is either the gas is shut off to the gas valve or it has a faulty oven safety valve. Note: Make sure the gas shut off lever on the pressure regulator was not accidentally shut off. If gas is present to the oven safety valve and the bake ignitor is pulling 3.5 amps then it sounds like a faulty oven safety valve.

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Joey S -
Sears Technician
September 20, 2010
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