Model #917275021 CRAFTSMAN Lawn, Tractor

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Question and Answers

Q:

craftman riding mover model 917275021 blades won't engage

A:

Thank you for your question.

I am sorry you are having a problem with the tractor. First, inspect the deck belt with the tractor turned off. If the belt is fine, check the wiring to the pto switch and the electric clutch. The problem might be just a loose connection. If the wiring looks fine, you will need a volt ohmmeter to check the voltage at the electric clutch. Have someone sit on the tractor and turn the key to the on position. Then pull out on the pto switch. You should have voltage on the two wires at the clutch. If you have the required voltage, I recommend replacing the electric clutch. If you do not have the voltage, you will have to check the voltage at the pto switch. I have traced the circuit out for you in the image below.

Please let me know if you need further assistance on the tractor.

Here is a link to order any parts you need. Sears Parts Direct .

If you do not feel confident repairing this problem yourself, then you can have it repaired at your home by a Sears technician. Here is a link for the website: Sears Home Services .

Thank you for using Manage my life.

Mark T.

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Mark T -
Sears Technician
August 22, 2011
Q:

My Craftsman tractor model 917-275021 will only turn about half as sharply to the right as to the left. Can this be corrected?

A:

We have checked with our product engineers about this several times in the past. The answer given to us is, the grass discharge is on the right side of the deck. The riding mowers are designed to turn sharper to the left for trimming around any obstacles as close as possible. You can't trim around obstacles with the right side of the deck because of the grass discharge chute.

This feature is designed into the riding mowers, and cannot be changed.

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Jimmy K -
Sears Technician
July 21, 2009
Q:

blowing out oil seal pto end 917275021 Craftsman Lawn tractor

A:

Thank you for your question and I can understand your concern.

Here is a link to the engine service manual.

Since the oil system is presurized, the seal could be blowing out for the following reasons:

  • Breather reed broken.
  • Clogged, broken, or inoperative crankcase breather.
  • Loose or improperly torqued fasteners.
  • Piston blow by, or leaky valves.
  • Restricted exhaust.
  • Malfunctioning oil pressure relief valve piston and spring in the oil pump. If relief valve is a one-piece style, staked to oil pump housing, removal should not be attempted, nor is internal servicing possible. If a problem with relief valve is encountered, oil pump should be replaced. See image of pump in the service manual.
A partial vacuum should be present in crankcase when engine is operating. Pressure in crankcase (normally caused by a clogged or improperly assembled breather) can cause oil to be forced out at oil seals, gaskets, or other available spots.

Crankcase Breather System:
Breather system is designed to control amount of oil
in head area and still maintain necessary vacuum in
crankcase.
A spring steel reed and stop is mounted on each bank
of crankcase, between lifter bores. When pistons move
downward, air is pushed past reeds into cylinder head
cavities. On cylinder 2, upper end of head is completely
sealed by rocker cover, so a low, positive pressure is
created in head cavity. Cylinder 1 rocker cover has
a hole in it for venting. Bottom nipple of oil separator
canister is fi tted into hole with a grommet. From top
nipple of canister, a breather hose goes back to air
cleaner base. Air moving into cylinder 1 head cavity is
fi ltered through oil separator and then is drawn into air
intake.
Upward travel of pistons closes reeds and creates
a low vacuum in lower crankcase. A combination of
low pressure above and low vacuum below forces
any accumulated oil out of cylinder 2 head area into
crankcase. On cylinder 1 bank you have atmospheric
pressure above and vacuum below, again drawing any
oil toward crankcase.

The service manual will be most helpful and I hope the information is helpful in diagnosing the cause of the seal to blow out.

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Joey S -
Sears Technician
June 13, 2014
A:

Thank you for your question and I can understand your concern.

Here is a link to the engine service manual.

Since the oil system is presurized, the seal could be blowing out for the following reasons:

  • Breather reed broken.
  • Clogged, broken, or inoperative crankcase breather.
  • Loose or improperly torqued fasteners.
  • Piston blow by, or leaky valves.
  • Restricted exhaust.
  • Malfunctioning oil pressure relief valve piston and spring in the oil pump. If relief valve is a one-piece style, staked to oil pump housing, removal should not be attempted, nor is internal servicing possible. If a problem with relief valve is encountered, oil pump should be replaced. See image of pump in the service manual.
A partial vacuum should be present in crankcase when engine is operating. Pressure in crankcase (normally caused by a clogged or improperly assembled breather) can cause oil to be forced out at oil seals, gaskets, or other available spots.

Crankcase Breather System:
Breather system is designed to control amount of oil
in head area and still maintain necessary vacuum in
crankcase.
A spring steel reed and stop is mounted on each bank
of crankcase, between lifter bores. When pistons move
downward, air is pushed past reeds into cylinder head
cavities. On cylinder 2, upper end of head is completely
sealed by rocker cover, so a low, positive pressure is
created in head cavity. Cylinder 1 rocker cover has
a hole in it for venting. Bottom nipple of oil separator
canister is fi tted into hole with a grommet. From top
nipple of canister, a breather hose goes back to air
cleaner base. Air moving into cylinder 1 head cavity is
filtered through oil separator and then is drawn into air
intake.
Upward travel of pistons closes reeds and creates
a low vacuum in lower crankcase. A combination of
low pressure above and low vacuum below forces
any accumulated oil out of cylinder 2 head area into
crankcase. On cylinder 1 bank you have atmospheric
pressure above and vacuum below, again drawing any
oil toward crankcase.

The service manual will be most helpful and I hope the information is helpful in diagnosing the cause of the seal to blow out.

Read More
Joey S -
Sears Technician
June 13, 2014
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