Model #59671272101 Kenmore bottom-mount refrigerator

  • Door Handles/accessories
    3 Results
  • Controls/light Covers
    3 Results
  • Evaporator/freezer Control
    3 Results
  • Shelving Assembly
    3 Results
  • Cabinet Back
    3 Results
  • Machine Compartment
    3 Results
  • Insulation And Roller Assembly
    3 Results
  • Light Switches/drain Funnel
    3 Results
  • Door Assembly
    3 Results
  • Ice Maker Assembly
    3 Results

Troubleshooting

Error Codes

Error Code:

Condition:

Check/Repair:

Question and Answers

Q:

Kenmore Refrigerator not cooling

A:

Several different problems could be preventing the refrigerator from cooling properly. You could have a problem with the return air duct from the refrigerator icing up. You could also have an automatic defrost system problem that is causing excessive frost and ice on the evaporator. This can restrict air flow to the refrigerator. A problem with the air damper at the top of the refrigerator can also be stuck closed.

Here are some tips that should help:

  • Make sure that the vent at the top of the refrigerator (circled in red on the first image below) is not blocked by food items.

  • Check for air flow through that vent when the compressor is running. You should feel a slight flow of cold air through that vent. If you feel no air flow, check the return vent on the bottom left side of the refrigerator to see if that vent is blocked or iced up. If that vent is blocked, you will not get proper air flow through the refrigerator. Also check the evaporator cover which is the inside back wall of the freezer. If you see frost or ice build-up on that cover panel, then you likely have an automatic defrost system problem in the freezer. If you see no problems with the return air vent or the evaporator then you may need to replace the air damper at the top of the refrigerator (part R0161050). That part is shown in the second image. You can order that part from the Sears PartsDirect website. Here is a direct link for that part: Damper control .

  • If the return vent is iced up, then you can likely restore cooling to the refrigerator by defrosting that area. You can properly store the food and use a heat gun (or hair dryer) on a low setting to melt the ice and frost blocking that vent. Allowing the refrigerator to remain off with the doors open should also defrost that area but it would take longer (probably about 24 hours). Once the vent is defrosted, you can start the refrigerator and see if it cools properly. Check the freezer setting. It should be set at 4 or the middle position. Setting the freezer too cold could cause this vent to ice up again. The freezer should be kept at about zero degrees. If this fixes the problem for a while but the vent continues to ice up, then you may need to install a heater kit in that vent (part R0131581). You can order that kit from the Sears PartsDirect website. The instructions for installing that kit are shown in the 3rd and 4th images. You will need to _unplug the refrigerator and remove the evaporator cover inside the freezer to install that kit. The ice maker and other items in the freezer will need to be removed before to take of the evaporator cover. The 5th image below shows a parts diagram of the evaporator cover. This should help you remove it.

  • If you suspect that there is excessive frost on the evaporator, you can unplug the refrigerator and remove the evaporator cover as described above. You can manually defrost the evaporator using a heat gun on the low heat setting. This should restore the cooling in your refrigerator at least for a while. If the frost returns, then you probably have a failed component in the automatic defrost system. The timer for the defrost system is inside the machine compartment at the back of the refrigerator (on the bottom). You can remove the back bottom cover to access that area. The 6th image shows the timer as Key 14. The 7th image shows a photograph of the timer. While the refrigerator is running, you can manually advance that timer until the compressor shuts off. At that point, the defrost heater should turn on. If not, you could have a bad defrost heater, a failed defrost bi-metal thermostat, a bad contact in the timer or a wiring failure in that circuit. The heater and thermostat are shown in the 4th image. The 8th image shows a wiring diagram for this refrigerator. This information should help you diagnose a problem with the automatic defrost system.

I hope that these tips help. If you need more assistance, reply with additional details and we will assist you further.

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Lyle W -
Sears Technician
January 01, 2011
A:

Here are some of the additional images.

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Lyle W -
Sears Technician
January 01, 2011
A:

Here are the final 2 images.

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Lyle W -
Sears Technician
January 01, 2011
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