Model #56569481890 Kenmore countertop microwave

  • Cabinet
    3 Results
  • Switches And Microwave
    3 Results
  • Door
    3 Results
  • Control Panel
    3 Results
  • Power And Control Circuit Board
    3 Results

Question and Answers

Q:

Microwave Oven Operating Instructions

A:

I have checked all of our resources but I did not find an electronic copy of that owner's manual that would have operating instructions for your microwave. Since the manual is no longer available from the parts department in a hard copy, it does not look like we will be able to help you with that document.

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Lyle W -
Sears Technician
June 14, 2011
Q:

How do I clean the space between the glass and screen on the door of my 1998 microwave?

A:

Any time anything is done to a microwave door the unit should be leak tested with a survey meter. I am sending you the instructions for cleaning the door and the law that requires testing. If you have access to a survey meter you can take the door apart and clean it.

Begin by unplugging the electrical cord.

  • Remove the screws around the sides and back of the microwave case and remove the case.

  • Remove the bolts and nuts that hold the upper hinge on the cabinet and remove the door. Place the door handle down on a pad on your counter top.

  • With a small flatblade screwdriver pry the inner portion of the door out of the door frame. Take it easy and slow. Pry the portion of the inner panel where your screwdriver is up about ¼-3/8 of an inch at a time. Go around the door several times. The plastic inner pane (called a choke) will break if you pry too much at a time.

  • The next panel will pry out as well and you can access the glass and front screen of the door.

WARNING: A microwave leakage test must be performed any time a door is removed, replaced, disassembled, or adjusted for any reason. A microwave leakage check, to verify compliance with the Federal performance standard, should be performed on the oven before it is used after any repair. Microwave ovens are probably the most dangerous of consumer appliances to service. Very high voltages, up to 5000 volts at potentially very high currents are present when operating. This is a deadly combination. These dangers do not go away even when unplugged. There is an energy storage device called a high voltage capacitor that can retain a dangerous charge for a long time. If you have the slightest doubts about your knowledge and abilities to deal with these hazards, replace the oven or have it professionally repaired

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Jimmy K -
Sears Technician
April 21, 2008