Model #11096375100 Kenmore residential dryer

  • Top And Console
    3 Results
  • Cabinet
    3 Results
  • Bulkhead
    3 Results

Error Codes

Error Code:

Condition:

Check/Repair:

Question and Answers

Q:

Dryer will not shut off. 11096375100 Kenmore Electric dryer

A:

Thank you for your question and I understand your concern.

The only difference in the operation between "Auto High' and "Auto Low" is that when set on "Auto Low" timer contacts V and BU makes to timer contact BK. This causes the operating thermostat heater to get hot which will cause the operating thermostat to open sooner to obtain a lower operating temperature. Otherwise, the operation is the same as "Auto High". I added an image of the wiring diagram below and you can see the difference in the two cycles by looking at the "Timer Cycle Schedule in Minutes" chart. It shows which contacts are closed by the gray lines in the blocks. 

If the timer will advance through the "Auto High" cycle and shut off but not advance and shut off when set to the "Auto Low" cycle would be very unusual. The timer motor is only going to have 120 volts supplied to once the operating thermostat opens/when the heating element cycles off.

The timer contacts TM and OR is closed in the "Auto High" and when the timer is set to "Auto Low". The only difference between Auto High and Auto Low is the temperature at which the operating thermostat will open and breaks the Line one (L1) voltage supply from the one terminal of the heating element.

When the timer is set on "Auto Low"; timer contacts BK, V and BU are closed throughout the complete cycle. When these contacts are closed, voltage is sent to the operating thermostat heater. This causes the operating thermostat to heat up faster which cause the thermostat to open sooner which accomplishes the LOWER operating temperature. 

So, with this said, I suggest monitoring the voltage supply to the timer motor across the two timer motor leads connected to timer terminals TM and BK. The only time there will be 120 volts supplied to the timer motor is when the operating thermostat opens and the heating element shuts off. The timer will not advance immediately; the timer motor run time must accumulate before the timer will advance one increment. The heating element may have to cycle on and off several times before the timer will advance. As long as the heating element is on, there will not be any voltage supplied to the timer motor lead. NOTE: I do not recommend making any voltage measurements unless you have experience and feel safe and confident in doing so; otherwise I suggest calling a service technician to diagnose and repair your dryer.

The thermostat heater is part of the operating thermostat. Check and make sure the thermostat is wired up correctly using the wiring diagram I added below.

 Check the things I have covered here and if I may be of further assistance as more details become available, please reply to this post.

 If you get to the point where you need to have a service technician diagnose and repair this failure, you can schedule service through this link: Sears Home Services.

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Joey S -
Sears Technician
September 05, 2013
Q:

Dryer not heating up

A:

Thank you for your question and I understand your concern.

The dark slash marks is likely caused by clothing getting between the rear drum seal and the support rollers (key#21) and the roller is leaving marks. You need to look at the rear drum seal to make sure it's intact. It may need a couple of new drum support rollers too if there worn out and causing the drum to sit too low. I added an image below with instructions on replacing drum rollers.

There could be one out of many reasons why your dryer fails to heat:

  • Timer
  • Thermal cutoff (key#1)
  • Operating thermostat (key#42)
  • Hi limit thermostat (key#34)
  • Heating element (key#14)
  • Motor centrifugal switch (on motor)
  • Burnt wire connection
  • Lack of proper voltage (220 volts)

I would suspect a faulty thermal cut off or a burnt out heating element preventing your dryer from heating providing the dryer is getting the proper voltage (220 volts) supply. Disconnect the power cord and then remove the rear panel to access the thermal cut off and heating element as well as the operating thermostat and high limit. Note: The voltage supply should be checked and confirmed before any specific diagnostic steps are taken. The dryer must have the proper voltage supply or it will run but not heat.

The thermal cut off and heating element can be disconnected and tested for continuity with an ohm meter as shown in the YouTube video I added as well as the other components connected in series with the heating element. NOTE: Disconnect the power cored from the power source before servicing your dryer.

If you do not feel confident repairing this problem yourself, then you can have it repaired at your home by a Sears technician. Here is a link for the website: Sears Home Services .

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Joey S -
Sears Technician
April 11, 2011