Easy DIY Riding Lawn Mower Repairs

 

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By Kim Hillegass, Sears PartsDirect

Grass growing up to the knees is a sure sign it's time to mow. If the grass has gotten so high because of a problem with your riding lawn mower and you're not sure you can tackle the repair yourself, think again. Our DIY Riding Mower and Tractor Repair section offers troubleshooting tips to help figure out what the problem might be.

These nine repairs are simple enough for most beginners and take between 15 and 45 minutes. For a complete list of our DIY riding mower repair guides, see Riding Mower and Tractor Repair Guides.

Worn or Damaged Tire

The tires on a riding lawn mower or lawn tractor will wear down over time. Damage also can happen during normal use. We have easy-to-follow directions to replace both the front and rear tires in our DIY repair guides How to Replace a Front Tire on a Riding Lawn Mower and How to Replace a Rear Tire on a Riding Lawn Mower.

Broken Seat Switch

If the riding mower shuts off after you release the brake, it might be due to a broken seat switch. The seat switch is a safety device that prevents the riding mower from running if no one is sitting on the seat. Our DIY repair guide How to Replace the Seat Switch on a Riding Lawn Mower shows how easy it is to replace the seat switch.

Cracked or Broken Seat

The seat on a riding mower is for more than just comfort; it holds and makes contact with the seat switch when you sit on the mower, allowing the mower to run. If the foam cushion in the seat is missing or if the seat is cracked or broken, the seat might not make contact with the switch and the engine will shut off when you release the brake. Replacing the seat is simple, and we show you how to do it in our DIY repair guide How to Replace the Seat on a Riding Lawn Mower.

Broken or Bad Spark Plug

If you notice the engine on your riding lawn mower runs rough or is hard to start, you may have a broken or fouled spark plug. Replace the spark plug annually to keep your mower running smoothly. This is an easy fix, and we show you how to do it in our DIY repair guide How to Replace the Spark Plug in a Riding Lawn Mower.

Clogged or Dirty Air Filter

The air filter on a riding mower traps dirt and debris, keeping fuel going into the carburetor clean. Over time, this dirt builds up in the filter and can cause the engine to run rough or stall. Replacing the air filter is an easy repair, and we show you how to do it in our DIY repair guide How to Replace the Air Filter on a Riding Lawn Mower.

Bad Fuel Filter

The fuel filter on a riding mower prevents debris in gasoline from entering the carburetor. If the engine begins to run rough or stops completely, a clogged fuel filter may be preventing enough gas from getting to the carburetor. This is another easy fix, and instructions are in our DIY repair guide How to Replace a Fuel Filter on a Riding Lawn Mower.

Bad Fuel Pump

The fuel pump moves fuel from the gas tank to the carburetor. If it fails, the carburetor doesn't get the gas it needs and the engine will die or won't start. Our DIY repair guide How to Replace a Fuel Pump on a Riding Lawn Mower gives detailed instructions for this simple repair.

Failed Ignition Switch

If the engine in your riding mower won't stop when the key is turned to off, or the engine won't start when the key is turned to on, the most likely problem is the ignition switch. The instructions for this easy repair are in our DIY repair Guide How to Replace an Ignition Switch in a Riding Lawn Mower.

Bad Ignition Coil

An ignition coil, sometimes called a spark coil, produces the energy needed for the spark at the spark plug. Our DIY repair guide How to Replace an Ignition Coil on a Riding Lawn Mower gives easy-to-follow instructions for this quick and easy repair.

 

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