Easy DIY Garage Door Opener Repairs

 

file

By Kim Hillegass, Sears PartsDirect

The convenience of opening the garage door with a simple click of a button is something you don't really think about, until the garage door opener fails and you’re stuck either inside or outside the garage. Fortunately, several garage door opener repairs are easy and take only 15 minutes.

And if you’re up for other repairs, head on over to our DIY Garage Door Opener Repair section for troubleshooting tips, error code charts and videos, along with common parts and answers to common questions about garage door openers.

Defective Garage Door Opener Safety Sensor

The garage door opener has two safety sensors, one that sends an infrared beam and one that receives the infrared beam. If an object or person breaks the beam, a closing garage door will reverse direction preventing damage or injury. If a safety sensor fails, the remote won't work and the lights on your garage door opener will blink.

Replacing the safety sensor is simple if you follow the instructions in our DIY repair guide How to Replace the Safety Sensor for a Garage Door Opener.

Failed Garage Door Opener Wall Control

The wall control is located on the wall in the garage, usually next to the door from the garage to your home. Pressing the button opens or closes the garage door. If the door doesn't open or close when you press the wall control button, replace the control. It's an easy repair, and we show you how in our DIY repair guide How to Replace a Garage Door Opener Wall Control.

Bad Garage Door Opener Battery

The battery in your garage door opener is located in the motor unit mounted on the garage ceiling. The battery lets the opener operate in the event of a power outage. If the battery no longer holds a charge, you should replace it. Our DIY repair guide How to Replace the Battery in a Garage Door Opener shows you how to do it.

Universal Garage Door Opener Accessories

Part #:
Earn points
Part #:
Earn points
Part #:
Earn points
Part #:
Earn points