Model #W132W JENN-AIR Built-In Oven, Electric

  • Control Panel
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  • Internal Controls
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  • Oven
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  • Body
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  • Door
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  • Wiring Information
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  • Wiring Information (series 23)
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Question and Answers

Q:

My Jenn-Air wall oven bake element is not working. It was shorted out so I replaced it. but still not working. I measured the voltages. the details are below.

A:

I know this type of information can be very helpful for you to have. While you are waiting for your expert answer, I did some research on the unit. I was unable to locate information that would be helpful with regards to your question at this time. Your expert will answer within 24-48 hours with detailed information. Thank you for using Manage My Life.

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Alina F. -
December 20, 2011
A:

Thank you for sending the voltage readings. Please reply on this thread and include the model of the oven. I need to look at the wiring schematic for the oven. Also when you made the voltage readings you sent was the oven control turned to off, broil, or bake?

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Jimmy K -
Sears Technician
December 20, 2011
A:

This is Jenn-Air W132W wall oven. Voltage readings were taken with the oven running at bake. I measured the bake element resistance when it was disconnected and also when it was connected but not running. This is a new bake element that i just bought. I haven't yet been able to access the rear Hi Limit as was unable to remove the oven from the wall yet. If I need to remove the unit from the wall please do send some suggestions on how to remove it from the wall. I have remove the door and all the all the surrounding screws and can see teh back of the oven all the way in. but when i try to pull it out it doesn;t come out. there are some screws that if removed, remove the front surrounding plate of the oven chamber. not sure i need dismantle it to that extent to remove the oven. I thought this will just pull out from the wall cabinet with some force. regards, Srinivas

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srinivas -
December 20, 2011
A:

srinivas, thanks for sending the model number of the oven and the information of how you made the voltage tests. Please make one more voltage test. With the control turned off and the wires connected to the bake element, read voltage between L1B and BA. If you don't read 240 volts, the hi-limit thermostat is tripped or bad. If you do read 240 volts, the oven control (clock) is bad. To remove the oven from the wall you should open or remove the oven door. On each side of the oven there should be 2 screws holding the outer edge of the oven trim to the cabinet. Remove those screws and pull the oven forward out of the opening. I suspect your oven was forced into a tight opening. It should pull forward.

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Jimmy K -
Sears Technician
December 22, 2011
A:

I already provided the voltages between L1B and BA in my first coment. I am not able to get any proper reading between L1B and BA. L1B and BR is 240 as expected. I'll double check this with control turned off. 1. how do determine that the Hi-Limit is bad? is there any voltage reading across the Hi-Limit that I can check. 2. How do i know that it is tripped and needs to be reset. thanks for your help.

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srinivas -
December 22, 2011
A:

srinivas, the voltage check across L1B and BA has to be made with the control turned off. I read and understood what you wrote. To test the high limit read across the terminals. If the high limit is closed you will read 0 volts. If you read any volts the contacts inside the high limit are bad.

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Jimmy K -
Sears Technician
December 22, 2011
A:

the voltage accross L1B and BA with control turned off are not correct( its not ~240). something like ~5 or 6v. The voltage across the Hi Limit at the back of the oven connecting the bake elements is showing 240v. So do i need a new Hi-Limit thermostat or can it be fixed.

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srinivas -
December 24, 2011
A:

Srinivas, the voltage reading of 240 volts across the terminals of the high limit thermostat indicate the thermostat is open. Some high limit thermostats are resettable. If the thermostat is resettable it will have a reset lever on top of it. If you see an arm or button try pressing it down. If there is no reset, you need to replace the thermostat.

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Jimmy K -
Sears Technician
December 27, 2011
A:

HI Jimmy, thanks for all the help so far. one more question. I replaced the high limit thermostat and checked the voltage across it. there was no significant voltage. now i can see the bake element working. but the problem is it is working as if there is no high limit thermostat and the red line is shorted without any thermostat in between. the voltage across the L1B and BA is not reading correctly. I turned the power and the bake element started heating up and without any control board setting. Does that mean the control board is bad? I saw 2 different kind of boards Clock Assembly and Ctrl-elec on the web. which one do i need to replace the control board, if at all it needs replacement.

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srinivas -
December 29, 2011
A:

Hi jimmy, is there a certain way (direction) to connect the high limit thermostat or can it be connected in any direction to the bake element. I am not getting any voltage across the high limit thermostat and the bake element it starts heating up as soon as I turn the power on from the circuit breaker. there is no voltage across the L1B and BA wires on the control board but everything seems to be functioning from the controls. everything gets turned on and off from the control board. but the heating of the bake element does not stop unless I turn the complete power off to the oven. let me know what the problem could be.

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srinivas -
December 29, 2011
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Q:

Why won't my Jenn-Air oven model W132W heat?

A:

There is a high limit thermostat switch that could prevent the bake element from heating even though the broil element will work. The bake element could be bad as well. A wiring failure or a failed electronic control board could also cause this problem. If you shut off the breakers to the oven (some homes have fuses that would need to be removed instead of breakers), you can check the resistance of the bake element with a volt/ohm meter if you have one. If you don't have a volt/ohm meter, you can normally get one from your local Sears or hardware store for less than $20. To check the element (with the breakers for the oven shut off), remove the screws in the back of the oven cavity that secure the element to the back wall. You may need to remove the oven door to gain better access to this area. Carefully pull the element into the oven cavity. Measure the resistance across the leads of the element. You should measure between 10 and 20 ohms of resistance. If you measure Ol (open load or infinite resistance) then the element is bad and will need to be replaced. If the element is okay, then you would need to pull the oven out of the cabinet and locate the high limit thermostat for the bake element. I provided a wiring diagram in the image below. This high limit thermostat may be on the top of the outside of the oven cavity or on the top of the outside back wall of the oven cavity. It will have red wires connected to it. There is another high limit thermostat for both elements that has black wires connected to it. You can check the high limit thermostat in the same manner as you checked the element with a volt/ohm meter. The high limit thermostat should measure near zero ohms of resistance. If it is open, then it will need to be replaced. If both of these components are okay then a wiring failure or a failed relay on the control board would be the likely cause of your failure.

These tips may help you diagnose and repair this oven failure. If you need more help, resubmit your question with additional details.

NOTE: Be sure that you completely disconnect electrical power to the oven before accessing internal components. Also, internal metal edges in the oven can be sharp. Protective gloves are recommended.

If you do not feel confident repairing this problem yourself, then you can have it repaired at your home by a Sears technician. Here is a link for the website: Sears Home Services .

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Lyle W -
Sears Technician
March 08, 2010
A:

Hi Lyle, My bake element is not working i the my Jenn-Air wall oven . it got shorted out, so I replaced the bake element but still not working. Here's what I tried to check in the wiring diagram that you gave I tested the following voltages. between Red wire connected to bake and white (neutral) - ~120v between L1B and BR (Purple) on the control board - ~ 240 v between the L1B and BA (yellow) on the control board ~ no proper reading. between the yellow and red connected to bake element ~ same as L1B and BA above. no proper reading. Resistance between bake elements was ~24 Ohms. All other voltages including the lamp, aux were all getting ~122v reading on the multimeter. Except between the L1B (black) and the BA (yellow) element on the control board. I couldn't reach the fan or the connector board near the top/back the part of the oven but i am sure the voltages will check fine. Do you think it is the control board element for bake that is gone or the Hi Limit thermostat on the red wire. But the red wire is showing ~120v+ on the meter. not sure how to read into these readings. this is the first time i have opened the oven. if it is the control board, what else can be checked to make sure that it is not the control board problem. Also if it is the control board issue then how do i replace the components. are those availabe easily. waiting for your response Regards, srinivas Plano, tx

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srinivas -
December 20, 2011
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Q:

Jenn air wall oven F1 code

A:

I'm sorry that you are having some difficulties with your Jenn Air Wall Oven. I did a little research for you at Managemylife.com and found an expert answer to a similar question that may help until your expert can respond to your specific question. The link is attached below. If you decide to schedule service and have a qualified technician help you, I have also attached a link to Searshomeservices.com. I hope these links will help until your expert can respond.

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James -
June 21, 2011
A:

Thank you for your question.

I can understand wanting to know what else could be the problem with the wall oven.

I other thing I would suggest looking at is the oven temperature sensor.

First REMOVE POWER TO THE OVEN

You will have to re-move the wall oven from the cabinet and check the connector for the oven sensor to see if it is melted. If the connector is charred and melted, cut the wires behind the connector on both the sensor and the wire harness and hard wire the wires together with ceramic wire nuts. (Ceramic nuts can handle the heat)

If the sensor connections are okay then disconnect the connection block and test across the sensor wires with a multi-meter set to ohms scale and look for 1100 ohms at room temperature. If it is not within a 50 ohm range then replace the sensor.

The sensor part number if you decide you need it is: 12001656 and you can order it from:Sears Parts Direct .

If you do not feel confident repairing this problem yourself, then you can have it repaired at your home by a Sears technician. Here is a link for the website: Sears Home Services .

I hope this will help.

Thank you for using Manage My Life.

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Sam A -
Sears Technician
June 22, 2011
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