Model #EB12B COLEMAN / EVCON IND. Furnace/Heater, Electric

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Question and Answers

Q:

Help with Coleman Eb12b furnace troubleshooting.

A:

A furnace is definitely something we depend on and when it begins to malfunction it can be a huge inconvenience.  While you are waiting for an expert to respond, I have added a helpful link (click here) that may provide information to assist you with your question.

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Yadira B -
July 09, 2013
A:

I pulled up the owner's manual for my furnace already, unfortunately it doesn't have the specifics like most other manuals do. Basically I am narrowing it down to the blower motor is not pushing air, and I am not sure, but I think my outdoor unit was not coming on either (since I turned the thermostat to off, and then turned fan to ON). I checked the capacitor that we just changed, it doesn't look like it went bad. I don't see any bulging of it. I live in south Louisiana, and July is definitely NOT the time to have an A/C malfunction!!

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Lil_MsHandy -
July 09, 2013
A:

Thank you for using Manage My Life.  I am sorry that you are having issues with your cooling system.  I would be happy to go over some basic troubleshooting steps that you can safely complete.  Electrical troubleshooting is typically left to a professional to reduce the risk of electrical shock or misdiagnosis especially on 240VAC electric air handlers like yours.

 

Try turning the system off at the thermostat and then turning the fan to ON.  Make sure cooling and heating are off.  We want to see if the thermostat can make the fan turn on.  Does the fan motor run?  If the fan motor runs at normal speed then the motor is likely good.  If it won't run in cooling mode, try heating mode.  If it runs in heating but not cooling than there is an electrical issue that needs to be addressed or the motor has a bad winding.

 

We know the coil likely froze up because the fan is not running.  Check the furnace circuit breaker to make sure that power is going to the air handler.

 

If power is established and you can safely observe the interior of the air handler by removing the panels, look, but don't touch the capacitor.  If it is bulging or distorted then the capacitor is bad and will need to be replaced.

 

If the motor is not running and you feel that you can safely place your hand on the motor housing.  Check and feel if the motor is hot to the touch.  If so, the motor is bad.

 

Turn off power to the air handler and once again reach into the blower housing and attempt to spin the wheel.  If the wheel is hard to spin or feels wobbly then the motor is bad and needs to be replaced.  

 

Other than that, electrical resistance tests need to be done on the motor as well as low and high voltage checks done inside of the appliance.

 

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Andrew D -
Sears Technician
July 09, 2013
A:

*** Update *** Outside unit is turning on. Turned thermostat fan to ON, and saw my unit kick on outside. BUT no air flow in the house. Turning the thermostat to Cool and fan to Auto I can hear the unit trying to operate and feel cold air coming from the coils, but the blower in the furnace is not turning on. Would this be due to a capacitor issue, a bad blower, or could it possibly be a bad circuit breaker? I noticed the view on the bottom switch is red even though the breaker itself is not tripped. That couldn't possibly be it if I am hearing and feeling cold air from the coil right?

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Lil_MsHandy -
July 09, 2013
A:

Thank you for helping me!! I posted the last post before I saw your response. Based on what you said to try, this is what I have: Turning the fan to ON with heat/cool off, the outside unit turns on, but no air through vents. Same situation when either Heat or Cool is on. The circuit breaker: The switches are ON, but in the bottom switch, I noticed it is red even though it isn't "tripped". The capacitor: I can not for the life of me remember what the other one looked like when I replaced it, to determine if this one is bulging. I do remember that until I had the new one in hand, I couldn't tell the difference, Lol. ( If I upload a couple of images of the capacitor, could you possibly determine for me?) Turned the breaker off for the furnace unit and checked the "squirrel cage": it is spinning freely in either direction, no wobble. As for the motor housing, forgive me but not sure where I am supposed to find it and touch to check for heat. As stated in previous posting, when I tested the unit, I DID feel cold air from the evap. coils, and could hear freon being pushed through them.... just nothing coming from the blower. If I am remembering correctly, I THINK that it is doing the same thing it did when the capacitor went out last fall.

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Lil_MsHandy -
July 09, 2013
A:

The cold air you are feeling is from the compressor pumping refrigerant through the coil and cooling the air immediately around the coil. The coil is freezing because it is getting so cold that no air is blowing across the coil.

So the blower does not run in any mode. The capacitor doesn't appear to be bulging but that doesn't mean it's good. The capacitor could look normal but be electrically inoperative.

When I meant the motor housing I mean the actual motor. If power is being constantly supplied to the motor but the windings are bad or motor is bound, the motor casing will usually feel warm to hot. Given what I can gather so far I would have to suggest that the motor is defective. If you want to be certain that the breaker is ok, flip the breaker off, and then back on. It should feel like a tight snap when you turn it on. If when you flip it on and it clicks back there is a problem with the breaker or there is a direct short in the air handler. Keep in mind that you have an electric air handler and you may have circuit breakers on both the appliance and on the electrical panel of your home so you will need to check both.

I'm confident that the motor is defective and needs to be replaced along with the capacitor as any time that a motor is replaced, the capacitor should be replaced with it. This is not a difficult repair by any means but anytime that electrical work is involved I always suggest having a trained technician complete the repair.

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Andrew D -
Sears Technician
July 09, 2013
A:

Thank you again very much for all of your help!! I just got off the phone with Coburn's and he is going to test my capacitor for me. I have a feeling that when the evap coils froze, that water leaked onto it and caused the malfunction. And for a 5 dollar initial fix, I will definitely give that option first choice before getting into the motor replacement. Both the circuit breaker on the furnace and in my house panel are functioning, there is no weakness in either. And when thinking back to last time this happened, the symptoms leading up to the capacitor going out are all the same. I appreciate the SUPER SPEEDY response time, and all of the troubleshooting steps you have gone over with me!! You ROCK!! ;-) Now let's just pray that capacitor is the only problem and I will have air back by this evening. Will update you with the results from the tests when I return. Thanks again

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Lil_MsHandy -
July 09, 2013
A:

You're welcome. I am glad I was able to help. If you want to do a quick capacitor test and I urge you to be careful when doing this; with power on to the appliance, turn the thermostat to the OFF position and the fan switch to ON.

You can reach into the blower housing and spin the wheel once manually with your hand. If the wheel begins to spin on it's own slowly, then the capacitor is bad. If not, then it's the motor or something else. Always be careful though when putting your hands inside the unit as well as when disconnecting a capacitor that has an existing charge stored inside of it.

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Andrew D -
Sears Technician
July 09, 2013
A:

That test also works on the outdoor condensing unit fan motor. Really easy way to tell if it's the cap or something else.

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Andrew D -
Sears Technician
July 09, 2013
See more answers
Q:

CAN YOU EXPLAIN IN LAYMAN TERMS THE CYCLING OF THIS UNIT?

A:

When the room thermostat calls for heat, 24 volts will be supplied to the heating element switches (sequencers). As soon as the first heating element switch closes, the blower starts and power (240 volts) is supplied to the first heating element. Each additional element is staged on in successive intervals. When the thermostat is satisfied, the elements sequence off in reverse order and the blower will then turn off.

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Scott D -
Sears Technician
January 08, 2010
Q:

Where can I get a wiring schematic for an Evcon electric furnace model EB12B made in 1989?

A:

The wiring schematic for this unit is in the installation guide which is available through the owner's manual search tool. Here is a link for the installation guide: Installation Manual . I also provided the wiring schematic in the image below.

If you need more help, resubmit your question with additional details.

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Lyle W -
Sears Technician
January 05, 2010