Model #C36 THERMADOR Counter Unit Electric

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Question and Answers

Q:

So frustrated with Craftsman 25cc Gas Blower not starting - model #358.797170 - 2 Cycle

A:

It seems like you need some special tool to adjust High and Low carb speed settings. I assume they are pre-set at the factory and should be OK. Would this hinder starting? Seems doubtful. I would think it just wouldn't run as well. I even replaced small filter screen on carb and put in new inlet and needle. The setting seems similar to before.

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Chris -
July 19, 2011
A:

Of course I forgot to mention the obvious. I put new gas/oil in it (40:1 mix) as instructed per manufacturer.

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Chris -
July 19, 2011
A:

It does sound like you've addressed almost everything on this unit.

Are you sure the fuel lines are connected correctly? If there is any doubt, reverse them and see what happens. On the carburetor, turn the air adjustment screws all the way in until they seat. Do not turn them with any force once they set as it will damage the screws. Once they're screwed in all the way, back each one of them out 1 full turn and adjust from there as needed.

The compression should be fine as around 100PSI is pretty stand on a machine with some hours of run time.

Because the machine wants to fire up when you spray down into the plug hole, I'd say our main issue is going to be carburetor/fuel related. Having put a rebuild kit in place and cleaned the carb I don't know that the carburetor will be the issue unless it's just a matter of getting it adjusted correctly. If you have some carb cleaner you can use it as starting fluid. Spray it down the throat of the carburetor and see if you can get it to run long enough to get some basic carburetor adjustments done to where it will start.

Let me know where you stand with this.

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XX Wade_ -
Sears Technician
July 21, 2011
A:

Wade, this machine is just a nightmare. :) Here's the latest update. I figured out the carb adapter assembly was loose on the unit. I tightened the two allen bolts and it's totally secure now. Once I did that, I can get the blower to start now on the first or second pull max. :) That's good news. Now the bad news. I cannot get the blower to generate any power in full throttle. The power seems like 20% of what it was before. When I try to take it down to medium or low throttle, the engine dies. I'm hoping the screws weren't forced in too hard as you warned (should've read before). I'm guessing this could've happened as I'm using that makeshift tool (wire crimp connector) to adjust them. I have put them all the way set in and backed off 1 to 1.5 turns as mentioned. Turning the H screw counter-clockwise results in no pick-up of power. Something is wrong. If the carb choke is wide open and the engine is running, is it normal to have a fine mist spray of fuel/air shooting out? This is without the air filter on because I'm trying to adjust the mixture screws while the engine is performing. It's nice it starts now, but I don't understand the complete loss of throttle power as the few times it started before, that aspect was fine. It never ends! I looked through the Zama carb service guide at all reasons why the unit could have low power at full throttle. Most of the possibilities don't seem like an issue with my blower/carb. Would damaged mixture screws cause this issue? What about a damaged main check nozzle valve? I have attached two pictures. I'm wondering if you can tell from the picture of the screws if there is any damage? Of course I don't know, but I would assume the piston/cylinders are OK if the unit was able to run full throttle before without bogging down. I don't see any scoring on the piston. I wonder if a loose engine seal could cause this, but would the unit even start if this was a problem?

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Chris -
July 22, 2011
A:

I'm also wondering if the inlet check valve on the carb could be scrapped. This is non-replaceable. That main check nozzle valve can be replaced for $4-$5 I believe IF one can find parts. I don't think this is a possible reason why my unit would not hit full power on full throttle.

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Chris -
July 22, 2011
A:

Last comment - I have tried several settings for the metering level too. I used a straight-edge and it's flat with the carb body as mentioned in the Zama user guide. I still struggle with how to measure this process accurately. I have a Zama 'Z tool' coming in the mail. Based on the way things are running, I doubt that's the issue though.

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Chris -
July 22, 2011
A:

I'm pretty sure both of those screws are damaged. Every drawing I can find of them shows them as having a point and not rounded on the tip like that. I've never seen an air screw rounded on the end either. In your picture the brass plug is a welch plug. My first link to this post is a PDF file for the parts breakdown of your carburetor. I know this thing is frustrating you, my recommendation is to spend about $26 and replace the carburetor with replacement number 530071775. I know you mentioned you don't want to put more money in the blower (and I don't blame you), but playing around with these little carburetors can be a nightmare at times. Not knowing the history of the machine certainly doesn't help because you don't know how it was treated.

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XX Wade_ -
Sears Technician
July 23, 2011
A:

Wade at this point, I agree fully. Whoever owned this machine obviously did zero maintenance. I've already dropped about $35 into this w/the purchase price. I guess either I consider it a total loss or buy the $25 carb and get a usable machine (I really hope). If it works, I could probably sell it for $40-$50 as the rest of it is in very good condition. Or sell it for 'parts' and tell someone the carb is bad and needs to be replaced. Either way, it sucks I couldn't fix it easily. BUT, I learned a lot about carbs I never knew before. I now most likely have the ability to make simple carb repairs on units not as far gone as this carb. :) That will save me money in the long-run which is cool. I don't believe that circled area is the Welch Plug. I already replaced it. That was under the metering arm lever and more oval in shape (flat piece of metal). Not something I would touch again. I'm pretty sure the circled brass piece is the check valve nozzle assembly. BUT, I'm no expert. lol. Just following Zama's manuals.

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Chris -
July 23, 2011
A:

Now learning to tune a carb properly seems like a whole other battle to undertake sometime! :) I really want to learn more on this topic, but it's obviously impossible with a carb that doesn't work right to begin with.

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Chris -
July 23, 2011
A:

If it's not the welch plug then it's not removable, without destroying something. The drawing is not real clear as it only show the welch plug there. For me, I hate working on these little carburetors and in most cases I just replace them when it's feasible. Working on a carburetor is certainly the right way to learn how to work on them. You may look around the local want ads or even on Ebay and find a used carburetor for a mower or tractor for cheap and then go through it. Once you work on a bigger one (where you can kind of see stuff better) the smaller ones start to make more sense. but the smaller ones are still a pain in most cases.

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XX Wade_ -
Sears Technician
July 24, 2011
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