Model #580752580 CRAFTSMAN Power Washer, Gas

  • Pressure Washer
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Question and Answers

Q:

What would cause my pump to suddenly quit producing pressure? 580752070 Craftsman Pressure washer

A:

Thanks for the inquiry John and for using SearsPartsDirect.com.
Sorry to hear of the lack of pressure coming from the pressure washer, I know how frustrating that is when you're in the middle of a job.
The most common reason for low or no pressure from a pressure washer is a restriction in the nozzle. If the nozzle on the wand is restricted, extreme pressure is built inside the pump. If the unloader valve is working properly, it will open and let the water circulate inside the pump. Check to make sure the inlet screen is not plugged up. Also, remove the screen and look down in the inlet tube and make sure there isn't a lot of calcium deposits build up in there. 
If you have an air compressor, undo the hose connections and shoot compressed air into the hose while it's disconnected. Do the same thing to the gun. If there are any mineral deposits, this should help clear then out. You can do the same thing to the inlet side of the pump.

It is also possible for the unloader valve to fail or stick open because of lime or calcium deposits. Sometimes you can remove the unloader valve from the manifold and clean the inside of the opening and the unloader valve. Most of the time the unloader valve will be damaged when removing it. If this happens, you must replace the unloader valve. Before you condemn the unloader and get a new one, make sure to take the check valves out and make sure they're clean and not damaged.
I am sure that your issue will be in one of the above mentioned suggestions. For convenience, I have linked the PartsDirect page so that you can view the diagrams and parts on the unit.
Hope this helps and thanks for using SearsPartsDirect.com. We appreciate your business. 

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Jeff Wallace Sr -
Sears Technician
July 15, 2014
A:

Josh, I'll take your advice and check to be sure that the wand and pressure hose are clear of blockages. I do have an air compressor so that should be straightforward. I wonder if that's the problem though. One thing I noticed was that when I removed the high pressure hose and stared the engine, what came out of the outlet tube was a gurgling low pressure flow, rather than a high pressure stream. Does that impact your diagnosis? A couple final question...is the pump on this machine an axial flow design? And can you tell me who manufactured the pump. Thanks so much for all your help with this. John

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John -
July 16, 2014
A:

Thanks for the response John. 
You are correct, this pump is a vertical axial piston direct drive pump. The pressure washer was manufactured by Generac, and Briggs & Stratton is the parent company of Generac. The 580 at the start of the model number shows who manufactured the product for Craftsman. So the pump was more than likely manufactured by Briggs.  
With the hose not connected to the outlet tube and the water supply turned on, you should have a steady stream of water coming out of the outlet, just like a fire hydrant would shoot it out. That tells me you have a mineral deposit blockage somewhere inside the pump. I would get a screwdriver and stick it into the outlet with the water supply turned on. This may pierce the blockage and allow the water to come through. Watch out though, you may get a slight soaking when you clear the blockage. Once you have the blockage cleared, turn off the water supply and undo the inlet hose connection. Take your air compressor and shoot compressed air into the inlet tube with the outlet tube open. That should force any of the residual deposits out of the outlet tube. Once done, reconnect inlet and outlet hoses, and check operation. I've used this method to clean mineral deposits out of pressure washer pumps and it works well. 
One thing you can do in the future to prevent this is to use Pump Saver. It's a foam product that you would squirt into the inlet tube after operation to remove any trace minerals and lubricate the internal seals. It's a good product to have around after using the machine. 
Hope this helps you get back to the project at hand John, and thanks for using SearsPartsDirect.com. 

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Jeff Wallace Sr -
Sears Technician
July 16, 2014
A:

Just a side point I forgot to mention in my last response. Do not have the engine running when you are cleaning the pump out. The water will still cycle fine with the engine off. Don't start the engine until all the cleaning is done and you are ready to check final operation.

Best of luck!

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Jeff Wallace Sr -
Sears Technician
July 16, 2014
A:

Thanks Josh. I'll be back in the shop to work on the repairs this weekend and will get back to you with a report on the progress or with more questions. I sincerely appreciate your help. John

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John -
July 17, 2014
A:

Thanks Josh. I'll be back in the shop to work on the repairs this weekend and will get back to you with a report on the progress or with more questions. I sincerely appreciate your help. John

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John -
July 17, 2014
A:

Josh, Well I gave it the ole college try. Removed the inlet and outlet tubes, went in on both sides with a probe to try to break loose any mineral deposit, flushed and then blasted with compressed air. I followed your suggestions as best I could. Cranked the engine and still no pressure. Any other ideas / next steps? I have ordered a can of pump saver and will run that through the system when I get it but I'm not optimistic that will help. Your thoughts are truly appreciated. John

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John -
July 19, 2014
A:

Hey John, sorry to hear the cleaning didn't clear the blockage. At this point, you may have to disassemble the pump and make sure the valves are clean and remove any mineral deposits throughout. There are a lot of internal pieces, so you have to make sure you take pictures as you go and lay the parts out properly during disassembly to make reassembly easier. 
There are some great YouTube videos on pressure washer pump disassembly and cleaning procedures. 
To help out, I have included a link below for some of the pressure washer videos that may help in this repair. On the list, the 2 part series on "How to Fix a Pressure Washer" is pretty thorough. It's not a Craftsman, but the general procedures will help. 

Pressure Washer Pump Repair Videos

I would not use the Pump Saver as a means to try to clean the pump or fix the current issue. It is more for preventative maintenance to prevent these types of issues from occurring in the future. I would recommend to pull the pump from the unit, and systematically take the pump apart and clean the valves and anything that is visually dirty/clogged. 
Outside of tearing the pump down, the only other viable option would be the pump replacement. If you decide to replace the pump, the part number is 206376GS. 
Hopefully you are able to tear the pump down and try to clean it up, or at least give it a shot before replacing it. 

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Jeff Wallace Sr -
Sears Technician
July 19, 2014
A:

Thanks much Josh. I'll get started on the disassembly today. Too hot to do anything outside anyhow. This project may, however, test the limits of my mechanical skills so in the likely event that I am not up to the challenge, and I end up replacing the pump anyhow, let me ask a question. Although this pump is 8-10 years old, it failed with only 40-50 hours use. Is there a compatible after market pump brand that will provide a little more life than a direct replacement would? Or has Briggs and Stratton made improvements to the direct replacement that will give it longer life? In my experience, newer designs have engineered out cost but that comes with a sacrifice in quality and reliability. I'm actually willing to pay up ( a little bit) to get a higher quality pump but I'll need one that doesn't require a whole lot of modification to fit back. And finally, I note that the replacement pumps are all rated at 2800 psi. I seem to recall that the pressure washer itself is a 3000 psi model. Not that 200 psi will make a lot of difference, but I want to be sure that the distinction doesn't indicate that I'm looking at the wrong replacement part. As usual, thanks much for you help. I'm about to take some kind of Sears satisfaction survey and your efforts on my behalf will be reflected very positively in that review. Thanks Pal. John

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John -
July 19, 2014
A:

Thanks for the response John. You are correct, the new pump offered for the unit with part number 206376GS is a substituted pump from a newer unit. This pump comes equipped out of the factory on units that are rated 3000 PSI. An example of one such unit is 580.752580. 
This is a good pump and is widely circulated. The pump is factory sealed and won't need any maintenance for the life of the pump. It will also mount just as the original pump (198164GS). 
Going back to your concern about lifespan, if you regularly use the Pump Saver product after using the unit, it will prevent these blockages from occurring in the future and you shouldn't have any issues. All you do is take off the garden hose from the inlet, and then take off the pressure hose from the outlet, and squirt pump saver in until you see the foam come out of the outlet side. One can of Pump Saver will provide multiple usages, so you can store it until needed again. The biggy with pump breakdown is mineral deposits like calcium. It's really tough on these pumps over the years. 
If you do decide to replace the pump, you'll be happy with the new updated pump for the unit. You could also Google the OEM pump number and see if you can find the OEM pump (198164GS) offered online on sites like Amazon or Ebay. Quite often you can find discontinued parts on those sites, but you have to be cautious of 'knock-offs' coming from China and not OEM or NOS (New Old Stock).
Personally, I would disassemble it completely (you have nothing to lose by doing so), and try to clean it first. If that doesn't work out, I would order the new subbed pump along with the Pump Saver you've got coming already, and just be sure to use it after each use. 
I wish you all the best on the cleaning/disassembly and will keep my fingers crossed for you. At the very least, you'll expand your mechanical knowledge by tearing it down and learn a few new things. Those videos I linked before will be a great help. Have a great weekend!

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Jeff Wallace Sr -
Sears Technician
July 19, 2014
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