Model #580328330 CRAFTSMAN Generator

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Q:

Engine model type code 580.328330

A:

Hello glad to help.  Thank You for choosing Sears PartsDirect.com
 
 I am sorry and do understand your frustration when doing the repairs on the generator

Glad to help out.   Im  looking at your model number 580.328330 and you say you are looking for the model number of your Briggs and Stratton engine.   
 
For the model number of a Briggs and Stratton engine, there is a model and a type/code number.   It is usually around the muffler, and usually stamped in the casing.
 
I guess someone switched the original motor?   I am showing in my system that this motor originally came as a Kawasaki engine.  5 Horsepwer and model number FA210.
 
Good luck.  
 
 If you have further questions please let me know.
Thanks for choosing Sears PartsDirect.com
 

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Larry L -
Sears Technician
August 30, 2013
Q:

Sears Craftsman 2400 Watt AC Generator Model 580.328330 Only 1 Volt AC Output, should be 120 Volts AC Will item#37 part# 67462 "Diode Assembly" fix it?

A:

The ManageMyLife website is a great place to find answers to questions that need qualified and insightful responses. Some of these questions that are asked will need specific research and will be answered by an expert with-in two business days but usually sooner.

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Dezeray -
April 09, 2013
A:

MORE DETAILS : Electrical Tests: 1) Field Flashing: I first suspected it needed a field flashing, so I flashed the field. The method I used was to disconnect the Sparkplug, connect an AC male power cord into 1 AC recepticle, and then connected the power cord to a car battery. I made very, very sure the polarity was correct before connecting. I then pulled the starter cord 6 - 7 times and then disconnected the AC cord. I reconnected the Spark plug and started the generator. It only produced 1 volt AC on my Digital Multi Meter (DMM) from both AC recepticles. 2) Bridge Rectifier Board test. I tested the board with my DMM by putting the test leads on each adjacent pair of spade connectors with the DMM diode setting. This was 4 different combinations. Each pair of spade connectors showed continuity (Beeps) in one direction, but not in the, as expected. In Ohms it shows about .6 Ohms forward voltage drop. I believe this proves this part to be working correctly. Note: I also did the same test to the battery charger rectifier, with the same positive results. 3) DPE (Excitation Field) With the Bridge Rectifier Board disconnected, I connected my DMM to the AC input (Orange and Yellow) wires. It showed 2.7 Ohms, which is close to the 2.14 Ohms on the Electical Schematic diagram. I believe this proves DPE field windings winding to be working correctly.

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christopher -
April 09, 2013
A:

MORE DETAILS : Electrical Tests: 4) Brush Tests With the Brush assembly disconnected and removed, I tested with my DMM connected to the DC plus and minus connectors, and I then connected sides of the Brushes with a test lead using aligator clips. It showed 1.7 Ohms. I also connected at the end of the Brushes that connect to the rotor's Slip Rings. It showed about 10 Ohms. I then installed back in the Brushes. I connected my DMM to the DC white and black lines going to the Brushes and got 45 Ohms going to the Brushes, Slip Rings and then to the Rotor Windings. I am not sure if this suggests the Rotor windings are good also. 5) Rotor's Slip Rings. With the rotor still installed but with the Brush assembly disconnected and removed, I tested with my DMM connected accross the slip rings. Ohms readings varied widely, fluctuating constantly. From 10 Ohms to 90 Ohms to 150 Ohms, with the "median" value being about 30 Ohms. I took this to mean I suggessfully flashed the field and the pulsing magnetic field made a constant reading to not be possible. However I don't know if this shows a successful test on the slip rings. 6) Isolation of the Bridge Rectifier. I removed the rectifier DC black and white wires going to the Brushes. I connected a 9 volt transistor battery to the white and black leads, making sure polarity was correct. I started the generator for 15 seconds and measured the AC recepticle Voltage. It then output 12 Volts AC. This suggests to me that IF the Bridge Rectifier puts out higher and higher DC voltages, then the Rotor/Stator system will generate higher voltages up to 120V AC if the stator rotates at about 3600 RPM, as designed.

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christopher -
April 09, 2013
A:

MORE DETAILS : Background: This Sears product was built for Sears by Generac. I believe this generator was also known as a Generac G2600 or a Generac 8846-0. This part of Generac Inc. has been sold to Briggs & Stratton. This generator satidle for several years before I got it. I have the Sears Owners manual that includes some parts lists, explode view diagrams, and electrical and schematic diagrams. I am doing a system end to end test on the electic motor. I am testing the Excitation field, the Bridge Rectifier, the Brushes, the rotor Slip Rings to determine if any of these electical components failed. I removed the Bridge Rectifer board, item# 28, part# 66850. It has a 4 pin Rectifier component, what looks like a grey MOV (Metal Oxide Varistor), a resistor, and ground wire and 4 spade connector to connect to the AC input and DC outputs, all set in some sort of epoxy resin. Visual it appears to have no damage parts, but I can't test individual parts because of resin. I removed the Brush Assembly item # 25, part# 66386. It didn't have any mechnical damage or excessive wear and the plus and minus brushes moved on springs as expected. I ordered this part today, $18.50 plus S & H. Do I really need this part??? If so, most importantly, how does this part connect?? Secondary Question: 2) How do you suggest I perform a valid Rotor and Stator test? Perhaps I should make sure these big ticket items are OK before I waste time and money on unneeded electrical parts.

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christopher -
April 09, 2013
A:

CLARIFICATION : Item # 37, part# 67462 "Diode Assembly" is the part I ordered today for $18.50 plus S & H.

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christopher -
April 09, 2013
A:

RECORD of my chat session : Please wait for a site operator to respond. You are now chatting with 'Bobby O'. How may I help you? you: hello you: i have a Sears generator Bobby O: Hi, thank you for contacting us today. Bobby O: you: it is model 580.328330 you: i have questions on two replacement parts you: first question you: part 39253 is described two ways you: on http://parts.sears.com it says the part is a capacitor you: on the managemylife site it says it's a Capscrew you: which is the real deal? you: second question... Bobby O: I am glad to look into this for you. May I ask who I am chatting with? Bobby O: you: part 67462 is described as aa "Diode Assembly" you: I opened up my generator and looked at it you: that part does not appear to be part of the original unit you: how does that part connect to the unit? you: I am Christopher Bobby O: Thank you Christopher for including the model # and all the information. you: np Bobby O: According to my resources, the cap screw part #39253 has been substituted. you: FYI: this generator was also known as a Generac G2600 or a Generac 8846-0. Bobby O: The new part # is #STD835020 and referred to a cap/capactior. Bobby O: This is a manufacturer substitution. Part may differ in appearance but is a functional equivalent to prior parts including 39253. you: i hear what you are saying you: but it doesnt make sense you: a screw and a capacitor are 2 totally different things Bobby O: We at this level provide general troubleshooting. However, we do have a feature called "Ask an Expert" which allows you to post this question into an actual technician (for your second question). Bobby O: How the Expert feature work's is: You submit or post your question online and our expert will research and reply to your question within a couple of business day's sometimes sooner with answers and advice. From installing part's, testing parts, wiring diagrams.... you: ok

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christopher -
April 09, 2013
A:

Let me guess : (To Quote Myself) "Bridge Rectifer board, item# 28, part# 66850. It has a 4 pin Rectifier component, what looks like a grey MOV (Metal Oxide Varistor), a resistor, and ground wire and 4 spade connector". The "resistor" isn't really a resistor, it is, in fact the 6amp, 600 volt Diode built into the Bridge Rectifier board. And the green ground wire coming out of the Bridge Rectifier board is the ground connection for the epoxied in Diode. So the Bridge Rectifier board has the "Diode Assembly" integrated and the schematic I am working off has not been updated to represent that fact. And the "Diode Assembly I just ordered for $18.25 plus S& H is a waste, right? I bet the Diode Assembly is for other versions of this product that did not have it built in. Someone, someone, PLEASE, PLEASE tell me I am wrong !!

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christopher -
April 09, 2013
A:

testing, 1, 2, 3 .... testing

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christopher -
April 10, 2013
A:

I realized something last night. It is possible to test the integrated Diode. All you have to do is connect one test lead from the DMM to the ground wire from the Bridge Rectifer board, and the other lead to the negitive DC spade terminal. You can then test to see if the Diode has a .6 voltage drop in one direction, and no voltage in the other. I did this and it worked!! The Diode appears to be OK! I then realized this makes design sense. The reason for the Diode configuration in the schematic is for it to be a "Blocking" diode, to force DC flow in just 1 direction. I believe this is to make sure the negative DC brush is always negative, and the positive Brush is always positive, for the motor electric field to be correct. When ALL Bridge Rectifer board componets are working OK, the negative wire has less volts compared to ground, so the Diode does not send current to ground. However if the current flow attempts to reverse for some reason (like the rectifer fails maybe), then the working Diode stops the undesired reverse flow to the brushes and instead it sends it to ground. BUT, if the Diode FAILS for some reason, and all other componets work, the Diode ALWAYS sends current to ground (not desired). Perhaps that is what is wrong in my case. The Diode blocking circuit is not working correctly and all DC current is going to ground. And maybe why I get only 1 volt AC output is because a tiny bit of volts (about 0.6 volts.... the Diode forward bias or voltage drop off) is getting to the brushes and the electric motor is making 1 volt AC from the 0.6 volt input.

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christopher -
April 10, 2013
A:

So if my rectifer component tests OK, and if the Blocking Diode is OK, when why don't I get more than 1 volt AC? Well, when I tested the blocking Diode last night, and I learned another thing. I cleaned the Bridge Rectifer board very carefully last night before the test. I realized my first observation was correct. The resistor IS a resistor! The actual blocking diode is completely covered in that black expoxy resin. All you can see of it is the "barrel" part causing a bump or wave, it's completely covered in the epoxy. I'm guessing that my blocking Diode test only tested the Diode and it did not include the resistor in the circuit. So what does this all mean? It means the the rectifier component tests OK. It means the blocking Diode tests OK. So either the MOV (Metal Oxide Varistor) is bad, or the fixed resistor is bad. My best guess is that the resistor is burned out. The electrical schematic shows the MOV wired in the 4 diodes in the rectifer bridge to protect it from voltage surges, so I doubt that is the bad actor. From what I understand, while Diodes can burn out, in practice a fuse or a resistor burns out first and the Diode is protected. The resistor didn't even make the schematic diagram, so right now I'm betting the resistor wired in the circuit is cooked. It's hard to read the bands on the resistor. It's partially covered in black epoxy stuff. Maybe if i clean it off to remove the epoxy on top, I can read the bands. Maybe with great care and luck, the resistor can be removed using a heat gun to remove the epoxy w/o damaging any other parts. I doubt it. It's too tight.

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christopher -
April 10, 2013
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