Model #315101430 CRAFTSMAN Drill-Misc Craftsman

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Question and Answers

Q:

Where do wires go on replacing trigger switch on 3/8" reversible drill

A:

Having to make repairs on an appliance can be tough. I have taken the time to research on the Manage My Life website and have located a few links that you may find useful. While you are waiting for a detailed reply from an expert I have attached the links below.

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Priscilla V -
September 08, 2011
A:

Thank you for your question on how to wire the replacement switch on your corded drill.

I will need the manufactures name off the new switch to see if I can find the wiring pattern they use.

Another way to do it is if you have a volt/ohm meter you can ohm out the contacts by placing the probes into the wire holes on the switch and then pull the trigger to see if you have continuity.

As an example on the old switch it would have shown continuity between one of the load and line when you pull the trigger.

I would suggest putting one of your probes in 1 and 3 and then pull the trigger to see if you have continuity. If you do then that is a line and load connection.

If you do not feel comfortable with that please let me know what the brand name is on the switch and I can try to research for their wiring pattern.

Sam A.

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Sam A -
Sears Technician
September 12, 2011
A:

Sam A. : Thanks for help so far. There's no actual mfr name.; it has letter "C" with "SA" within the C ; also "MOD 7-23" and "CAPAX". (Old switch has "C-H", and "C&SA" as described above. Per your continuity suggestion (looking at bottom, hole #1 toward trigger): - Hole #2 & 3 are internally/permanently connected, full time. - #1 connects to #4 ONLY when trigger is depressed. (Not to #3) - A short black jumper from #4 goes to a top corner of the switch (also marked #4, of the 4 top corners -- top section of switch is the "reversing" function). QUESTIONS: - When you say "line" connection you are referring to the black wire of the power cord, right? (the old switch is labeled "line/line", which was the power cord, and I diagrammed black & white before disassembling) -And when you say "load" that would be the white wire from the motor, right? And that could go to either #2 or 3, right? So, if I'm right, it's: #1 = power cord black #2 = " " white #3 = white from motor I do feel comfortable, just don't want a mistake to destroy anything, after all this. Can you confirm? Really appreciate your help..... Frank

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Frank -
September 13, 2011
A:

Thank you for the update. Yes the line is the power cord. Black and White wires. The load is the wires that go to the motor. And yes the #4 is the loop wire for the drill to reverse. It looks like you have got it right. Just make sure you have a power loop which means that the resistance of the motor windings are in between the black line power and the white neutral and the switch connects the loop. Sam A.

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Sam A -
Sears Technician
September 14, 2011
A:

Thank you Sam - (for quick response on this part) I will go ahead, and will check with ohmmeter as you suggest here: "Just make sure you have a power loop which means that the resistance of the motor windings are in between the black line power and the white neutral and the switch connects the loop." This was something I suspected should be the case - I will check with meter before plugging in.....Thanks again - will report back on what happens.....Frank

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Frank -
September 14, 2011
A:

Just want to thank Sam A. for help - finally got up courage to finish installing new switch. As above, #1 = black power cord wire, #2 = white power cord wire, #3 = white wire from motor. As you suggested, checked continuity before plugging in - ohmmeter showed approx 10.9 ohms at the plug prongs, with trigger depressed, and "O/L" (open circuit) with trigger releassed, so with that,... plugged it in, tried it, and works fine, including variable speed and reversing. Thanks again.....Frank

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Frank -
September 17, 2011
A:

Frank, I had a similar problem, and thanks to Sam and you I now have my answers. Thanks guys, Tom

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tom -
September 17, 2011
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