Model #153331543 KENMORE Water heater, Gas

  • Water Heater
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Question and Answers

Q:

153331543 when it reaches temp it wqill shut down ignitor ,pilot and wats happening to my boiler?thanks

A:

I understand how frustrating it can be to have your water heater reach a certain temperature and it just shuts down. While you are waiting for an expert to respond, I have attached some helpful links below that may provide information to assist you with your question. Have a great day!

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Alina F. -
May 10, 2012
A:

Thank you for your question. I'm sorry you're having this problem with the water heater. This indicates a vent or ventilation problem. I'm attaching some pictures with instructions to clean this water heater, especially the arrestor. This can be a difficult water heater to service and clean. If the problem still occurs, a technician will be needed to check it. I hope this will help you.

If you do not feel confident repairing this problem yourself, then you can have it repaired at your home by a Sears technician. Here is a link for the website: Sears Home Services .

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Scott D -
Sears Technician
May 11, 2012
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Q:

Cause of sudden large amount of sediment in hot water line?

A:

Managemylife.com is always a great resource to find the answers to just about anything. Your expert will research your question and respond within two business days but usually sooner.

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Alina F. -
February 02, 2012
A:

I can only suggest some possible reasons for the sudden appearance of sediment at your faucets. Thanks for sending the information on the water softener.

The most common reason for this is the municipal water company working on some lines in the neighborhood. In the process of repairing or replacing old water lines breaks loose sediment that travels to our houses.

Sometimes water softeners fail and sediment build up inside the water heater. This sediment might break loose much later as the soft water is dissolving it.

You should probably remove the hoses for the washing machine, if you have one, and check the strainers inside the hoses and in the inlet of the water valve.

I hope this information helps.

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Jimmy K -
Sears Technician
February 04, 2012
A:

Thank you for the reply. I don't see how work on the municipal water lines could be the cause for the sudden sediment since it was only present in the hot water (see my original comment). Also, I had checked with my neighbors and none of them had similar problems. However, I will check out our water softener and provide more information thereafter. Some more information: I collected some of the greenish sediment and let it dry. When dry, it can easily be squashed into fine powder, unlike sand.

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Kurt -
February 07, 2012
A:

Kurt, I apologize for missing the part about only hot water. It does sound like the debris is lime from the tank of the water heater. I suspect the problem is a buildup from a time the water softener wasn't working correctly. The soft water will cause the buildup to release a little at a time. You might have this problem several times before the lime is all gone.

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Jimmy K -
Sears Technician
February 07, 2012
A:

We had two more incidents where the water faucets suddenly got clogged by what appears to be lime sediment. That happened after I thoroughly flushed the water tank and cleaned all strainers. Also, our hot water flow slowly decreased over the next several weeks, even without sediment in the strainers. In addition, the water temperature at the faucets decreased from hot to lukewarm within a few seconds, even though the dial at the water heater was set to the letter C (150 �F). By (carefully) touching the pipes connected at the water heater it became clear that the water in the tank was very hot. Next, I suspected a defect inlet tube (compare my post about "Replacement of inlet tube for Kenmore gas water heater, model 153.331543"). It finally turned out that the heat trap at the outlet nipple (item 23 on the manual picture) was first reducing the flow of water and finally completely blocking it. As mentioned earlier, we also use a recirculation pump for the hot water, with a timer. Only when the recirculation pump is off, it allows the water to flow thru it in reverse direction, depending on the pressure conditions. This is what happened in our case, with a partially or fully blocked outlet nipple. In this situation the cold water from the inlet tube, which may stir up the sediment on the bottom of the tank, is exiting before being heated thru the recirculation pump and pipe from the bottom of the water tank. With other words: a (partially) blocked outlet nipple in combination with a recirculation pump (when timer off) connected to the bottom of the water tank caused our reduced warm water flow, sediment in the strainers and lukewarm water.

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Anonymous -
March 30, 2012
A:

Thanks for sending the information. I have thought about your problem a number of times and wondered what the problem was. This information might help someone else.

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Jimmy K -
Sears Technician
March 31, 2012
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Q:

replacement of inlet tube for Kenmore gas water heater, model 153.331543

A:

When it comes to working on an appliance it can be challenging. While you are waiting for a detailed reply from an expert I have taken the time to research your model on the website and have came across the owners manual to your model. If you are interested in viewing I have attached the link below. Hope this helps!

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Priscilla V -
March 26, 2012
A:

Thank you for your question and I understand your concern.

In order to remove and replace the inlet tube the cold water inlet nipple w/heat trap must be un-threaded from the water heater. You will need a pipe wrench in order to remove it. Once the cold water inlet has been removed, the inlet tube can be removed providing you have enough room to lift it up and rotate it to certain angles to be able to total remove it. I added an image below showing the shape of the inlet tube (key#13). Be careful not to mess up the threads on the nipple when placing the pipe wrench on the nipple. Try to stay below the upper threads so not to mess up the threads.

I hope this is helpful. If I may be of further assistance as more details become available, please reply to this post.

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Joey S -
Sears Technician
March 27, 2012
A:

I understood that I had to unthread the nipple, but it was stuck. So was looking for help on how to get it unstuck. Second, I was looking for help about the inlet tube and how to remove it, once the nipple was unthreaded.The key to it is, as I found out later, that you need to use a small flat screw driver and pry it out, before you can rotate it out. After I successfully removed the inlet tube it turned out that it was not damaged at all. So, I put everything back together and refilled the water tank (while releasing the air thru the nearest faucet). Surprisingly, no hot water came out of the faucet. After some more checking it became apparent that no hot water was exiting the water tank. Next, after again lowering the water in the tank, I removed the Secondary Anode Rod w/Heat Trap (item 23 on the picture in the manual). It turned out that this nipple w/heat trap did not let any water go thru. Since I had no replacement parts available I just removed the inner part of the heat trap with a screw driver (a small plastic piece with two rubber flaps), reconnected the pipes and re-filled the tank. This time, the hot water ran freely, even at the same pressure as we had before our water heater troubles started. There is a very interesting connection with another problem, which I posted on 2/2/12 under the title "Cause of sudden large amount of sediment in hot water line?" I will add my findings there.

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Anonymous -
March 30, 2012
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