Model #11072512100 KENMORE Residential Dryer

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  • Burner Assembly
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Question and Answers

Q:

Kenmore dryer does not dry anymore.

A:

Having your Dryer not working properly can be really annoying. While you are waiting on an expert to answer your question, I found a great link in the manage my life website that can help you. I also found your diagram in the Sears Parts Direct website. I have attached the link below. Hope this helps!

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Dezeray S -
April 12, 2012
A:

Hi Michael,

Thank you for submitting a question to Manage My Life.

If the dryer is not heating the first thing I recommend is that you pull the observation plug out of the front panel (on the left side below the dryer door). Start a heated cycle with a medium load of wet towels loaded in the drum. Observe the ignitor on the gas valve assembly through the observation port. If it glows to initiate the lighting of the gas burner then the operating thermostat and the high limit thermostat are probably okay. The theory of operation for the gas valve assembly is shown in the first image below. The second image shows the wiring diagram for your dryer with the heating circuit traced in red through the igniter. You will normally need this technical information to determine whether the thermostat and other components in the heating circuit are okay. If the igniter is not glowing, I recommend that you unplug the dryer and remove the back panel. Check the thermal fuse first. Remove one wire and measure the resistance across the leads of the fuse with a volt/ohm meter. You should measure near zero ohms of resistance through this component. If you detect an open load (meter indicates ol -- open load or infinite resistance) then the thermal fuse is blown and will need to be replaced. If the thermal fuse is okay you can check the operating thermostat, high limit thermostat and the thermal cut-off fuse (this fuse is on the side of the heater box above the high limit thermostat) in a similar manner. If any of these components is open, the igniter will not glow to initiate the lighting of the burner. If the thermal fuse is blown, I recommend that you check the exhaust vent duct system to the outside of your home for a clog or restriction. An unresolved exhaust vent restriction could cause the thermal fuse to blow again shortly after it is replaced. If the thermal cut-off fuse on the heater box is blown then the high limit thermostat will need to be replaced at the same time since the high limit thermostat should have opened to prevent the thermal cut-off fuse from blowing.

If the heater is cycling properly according to the information provided below, then you can ventilate the laundry room and check the cycling temperature of the air coming out of the exhaust vent in the back of the dryer. You will need to disconnect the flexible vent and position the dryer so that you can measure the air temperature coming out of this back vent. This gas dryer should normally be always vented properly to the outside of the home but you can safely conduct a short (15 minute) test to measure cycling temperature if necessary. The dryer should heat up to about 150 degrees and then cycle between 140 and 150 degrees if the operating thermostat is working properly (the cycling temperatures shown in the third image do not pertain to this model). NOTE: Be sure that you reconnect the exhaust vent properly after conducting this short test.

This information should help you check the major components that will cause a no heat issue in this dryer.

If you do not feel confident repairing this problem yourself, then you can have it repaired at your home by a Sears technician. Here is a link for the website; Sears Home Services .

Here is a link that you may use to view the parts list diagram or to purchase any parts needed for your Kenmore model number 110.72512100 dryer .

I hope this is helpful. Check the things I have covered here and if I may be of further assistance please reply to this post.

Landell

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Landell -
Sears Technician
April 13, 2012
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Q:

how do i test the themostat for my gas dryer

A:

Hi, I definitely understand how frustrating not being able to test the thermostat can be especially since it has to do with your dryer. That is a very handy appliance in a household and saves you a trip from having to go outside in the hot sun and hang clothes onto the clothes line. I have taken some time to further your search here on the Manage My Life website and saw that other people had a similar question with an answer from an expert. I have attached the link below if you are interested in viewing the site. Hope this helps!

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Alina F. -
June 27, 2010
A:

The model number that you provided appears to be slightly off (by 1 digit). The closest model of gas dryer that I could find is 110.72512100. This answer is based on that model.

You did not indicate what type of problem that you are having or why you need to check the thermostat. If the dryer is not heating well (or not at all) then I recommend that you pull the observation plug out of the front panel (on the left side below the dryer door). Start a heated cycle with a medium load of wet towels loaded in the drum. Observe the ignitor on the gas valve assembly through the observation port. If it glows to initiate the lighting of the gas burner then the operating thermostat and the high limit thermostat are probably okay. The theory of operation for the gas valve assembly is shown in the first image below. The second image shows the wiring diagram for your dryer with the heating circuit traced in red through the igniter. You will normally need this technical information to determine whether the thermostat and other components in the heating circuit are okay. If the igniter is not glowing, I recommend that you unplug the dryer and remove the back panel. Check the thermal fuse first. Remove one wire and measure the resistance across the leads of the fuse with a volt/ohm meter. You should measure near zero ohms of resistance through this component. If you detect an open load (meter indicates ol -- open load or infinite resistance) then the thermal fuse is blown and will need to be replaced. If the thermal fuse is okay you can check the operating thermostat, high limit thermostat and the thermal cut-off fuse (this fuse is on the side of the heater box above the high limit thermostat) in a similar manner. If any of these components is open, the igniter will not glow to initiate the lighting of the burner. If the thermal fuse is blown, I recommend that you check the exhaust vent duct system to the outside of your home for a clog or restriction. An unresolved exhaust vent restriction could cause the thermal fuse to blow again shortly after it is replaced. If the thermal cut-off fuse on the heater box is blown then the high limit thermostat will need to be replaced at the same time since the high limit thermostat should have opened to prevent the thermal cut-off fuse from blowing.

If the heater is cycling properly according to the information provided below, then you can ventilate the laundry room and check the cycling temperature of the air coming out of the exhaust vent in the back of the dryer. You will need to disconnect the flexible vent and position the dryer so that you can measure the air temperature coming out of this back vent. This gas dryer should normally be always vented properly to the outside of the home but you can safely conduct a short (15 minute) test to measure cycling temperature if necessary. The dryer should heat up to about 150 degrees and then cycle between 140 and 150 degrees if the operating thermostat is working properly (the cycling temperatures shown in the third image do not pertain to this model). NOTE: Be sure that you reconnect the exhaust vent properly after conducting this short test.

This information should help you test the thermostats and other components in this dryer. If you need more help, submit additional details.

Read More
Lyle W -
Sears Technician
June 29, 2010
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