Model #11066914691 KENMORE Residential Dryer

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Question and Answers

Q:

No heat from Kenmore Dryer

A:

On something like this you will need to use a multimeter to diagnosis the problem. Use a putty knife to release the clips holding up the lower kick panel. You will see all of the thermostats & the heating element. I have sent you the wiring diagram showing the path of voltage to the heating element to your email address. Be sure to check the supply voltage first; an electric dryer will run but not heat if one of the double 30 amp breakers trip.

SAFETY NOTICE: Be sure to disconnect power to the appliance before performing any repairs. If you are not comfortable with doing any voltage checks that might be recommended, please contact your local service provider for repairs. Be aware that there could be sharp edges inside the appliance that could cause cuts or other injuries to yourself or others.

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biker dave -
Sears Technician
June 08, 2010
A:

Many thanks for the info and rapid response! As a 40 yr. Electronics Tech, I can handle the troubleshooting, just needed help with the access point which you have provided. Thanks again, Tony

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tonyd115 -
June 08, 2010
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Q:

What would cause my Kenmore dryer to run for about 15 minutes and then shuts off?

A:

Based on your symptom and details, the motor thermal overload is likely opening and shutting off the motor. The motor is likely bad and overheating. The audible click you hear is likely the motor thermal overload resetting inside the motor. Once the motor overload trips, the motor must cool down some before the thermal overload will click and reset to allow the motor to operate again.

Your dryer also has a push to start relay that could possibly open and shut the dryer off prematurely too. See images below. When the start button is pushed, voltage is directed to the motor and at the same time the push to start relay must close and remain closed in order to keep the motor running. The relay basically keeps R1 contact and R2 closed which completes a path of voltage supplied to the motor. The voltage must also pass through the thermal fuse and the belt switch before it connects to the motor. The push to start relay coil must also have neutral supplied to terminal CT1 which is provided by the door switch when the door is closed. So, if the door switch opens momentarily it will open the neutral to the relay at terminal CT1 and cause the relay coil to de-energize and open which will cause contact R1 and R2 to open which will break the voltage supply to the motor and it will quit running. So the faint click that you hear is either the push to start relay opening or you are hearing the motor thermal overload resetting. In order to diagnose the failure will require checking the voltage supply across CT1 and R2 once the motor quits running without opening the door. If voltage is present when measuring across CT1 and R2, then the relay should be closed and providing voltage to the motor. If it's closed then the likely failure is the motor. If you open the door after the motor quits, you should hear the push to start relay click open indicating the push to start relay was close at the time the motor quit running. This would likely mean the motor is bad.

When the door is open it will cause the push to start relay to de-energize and break contact between R1 and R2 which will remove voltage at R2 and cause the relay to open and shut off the motor. I added the wiring diagram in the image below. When the motor quits running, you should hear the push to start relay click and open if you listen carefully when you open the door and break neutral to the CT1 indicating that contact R1 and R2 were closed when the motor quit running.

I hope you have an understanding how the motor is started and kept running and not totally confused now.

Note: I do not recommend checking voltages unless you have experience and feel safe and confident in doing so, otherwise I recommend calling a service technician to diagnose and repair your dryer.

If you do not feel confident repairing this problem yourself, then you can have it repaired at your home by a Sears technician. Here is a link for the website: Sears Home Services .

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Joey S -
Sears Technician
March 10, 2010

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